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Sunday, August 3
 

2:00pm

W40: Improving Labs with Formative Assessment
Student misconceptions dealing with the invisible particulate-level world of chemistry is well documented in research. Misconceptions in lab are inevitable since the observations students see in lab are caused by the invisible particulate-level of chemistry. This workshop will model techniques to help identify and address misconceptions during lab. Remediating during lab is crucial because it provides instructors additional tools to overcome misconceptions that a class discussion does not. Classroom research will be shared. Participants will perform an AP Chemistry inquiry-style lab using probe ware and engage in techniques to address misconceptions during lab.

Moderators
MH

Melissa Hemling

Beaver Dam High School

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
PAD 206

2:00pm

W32: Get Engaged: Developing and Assessing Effective Activities to Teach Challenging Concepts
This participatory workshop is for educators who teach complex concepts that may be difficult to impart to students using standard lecture techniques. Explore demonstrations and engaging activities that get students out of their seats and thinking about complex concepts - such as factors that affect enzyme activity or how to determine molecular shape and polarity - while using fun props and aids. Participants will take part in an activity, discuss a Top 10 list of tips and strategies for developing effective activities, examine survey tools to assess the effectiveness of an activity, and explore potential pitfalls and strategies to avoid or overcome them. Participants will also share their experiences with in-class activities and collaborate on a new activity to enhance student learning of a challenging chemistry concept. Participants will leave with ready-to-use examples, plans for self-developed activities, and an assessment template for evaluating the effectiveness of their own activities.

Moderators
DF

Daniella Fisher

University of Cincinnati Blue Ash College

Speakers

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 207

2:00pm

S15: Student-Centered Learning with a Focus on Improving Process Skills in the Classroom and Laboratory: Student-Centered Learning in General Chemistry
The purpose of this symposium is to bring together practitioners of a variety of student-centered pedagogies (such as PBL, PLTL, POGIL, or TBL), from high school through university level. Emphasis will be placed on those approaches that require students to be actively engaged on a regular basis, with a focus on improving process skills such as communication, teamwork, critical thinking, or problem solving. Presentations that contain assessment of these student-centered approaches are especially welcome.

Presider: Marty Perry, Ouachita Baptist University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P96: Introduction to POGIL and The POGIL Project (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P97: Developing climate change activities in general chemistry (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P98: Caught on tape! Capturing the transition to a new active-learning classroom (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P99: Combining POGIL and Peer Instruction to enhance learning (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P100: Team-based learning to teach first-year chemistry (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P101: Learning coach experience: Benefits and challenges as perceived by peer tutors of an introductory chemistry course (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P102: Teamwork in Introductory Chemistry using POGIL activities in a large SCALE-UP classroom (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
Panel (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
GF

Gina Frey

Washington University in St. Louis

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 122

2:00pm

S9: Metacognition in Chemistry Education
Metacognition -- sometimes described as "thinking about one's own thinking" -- broadly encompasses various facets of metacognitive monitoring (knowledge of what one knows) and metacognitive control (regulation of one's own thinking processes), and has been linked to topics ranging from studying choices to problem-solving strategies to conceptual change. In this symposium, we hope to bring together discussions and research on the role of metacognition within teaching and learning chemistry that have previously appeared scattered among disparate symposia. To that end, this symposium invites submissions on metacognition in chemistry education, including, but not limited to: assessing student metacognition in various contexts and by various methods, relationships between metacognition and performance, interactions between metacognition and other student characteristics, and interventions or curricula designed to foster improved student metacognition in chemistry.

Presider: Seth Anthony, Oregon Institute of Technology

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P56: Understanding and supporting self-regulated learning in an undergraduate chemistry course (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P57: Targeted Learning Community for General Chemistry (TLC-GC): A holistic approach to addressing metacognition and self-regulation skills (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P58: Students' metacognitive skills in a general chemistry course: What are they and how do they change? (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P59: Using clickers to promote metacognitive awareness in the introductory chemistry classroom (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P60: Why do they think they know? Exploring a conceptual/algorithmic divide in students' judgments of confidence (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P61: Understanding how students differentiate between their conceptual understanding of chemistry topics and their problem solving abilities around those topics (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
SA

Seth Anthony

Oregon Institute of Technology

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 107

2:00pm

W9: Before, During and After Class Learning Cycle Activities
This workshop introduces the instructional tactics and materials of a technology-based inquiry-oriented instructional project. Examples of instructional materials to be used “before”, “during”, and “after” class meetings will be explored. The Before Class Exploration (BCE) is a web-based exercise that students do before class. The BCE requires approximately 15 minutes to complete and upon submission, students receive a copy of their responses and an expert’s response for comparison. The instructor can access all student BCE responses prior to lecture to gain a better picture of the student’s pre-existing knowledge. The During Class Invention (DCI) is designed to be completed by small cooperative groups or instructor led discussion. Students can report their consensus response using "clickers". The After Class Application (ACA) is a web-based set of questions that allow students to apply their knowledge of the concept introduced by the BCE and ‘invented’ by the DCI. The Project website is http://genchem1.chem.okstate.edu/BDA/Topics.php.

Moderators
JG

John Gelder

Oklahoma State University

Speakers
MR

Michael R. Abraham

University of Oklahoma
TG

Tom Greenbowe

Iowa State University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 116

2:00pm

S16: The Analytical Classroom: Teaching Beyond Quantitative Analysis
Quantitative Analysis is often the bane of lower-division undergraduate chemical education, because students have a hard time seeing beyond the fairly rigorous calculations and titrations. This course is often the first taste that a Chemistry major gets of what is really expected of them in terms of independent thinking and problem solving, as well as higher-level writing and lab skills. This symposium will explore new strategies to modernize the course, as well as methods to provide context from outside the classroom. Specifically in the lecture, how are instructors using journal articles, descriptions of modern analytical techniques, writing skills, and problem solving to help students see the utility in this course. In lab, how are instructors going beyond the traditional titration experiments and providing real-world problem solving models, or real-world experimental contexts, as well as intensive writing workshops.

Presider: Kate Stumpo, University of Tennessee-Martin

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P104: Using process-oriented guided-inquiry active learning in analytical chemistry: The ANA-POGIL project (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P103: Using POGIL activities to teach analytical chemistry (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P105: Team-based learning in a large Analytical course (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P106: Modernizing the quantitative analysis laboratory (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P107: Promoting the writing process while teaching scientific writing in an analytical laboratory course (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P108: Project-based experiences in Quantitative Analytical chemistry laboratory (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P109: Modernizing the Quantitative Analysis lecture (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
KS

Kate Stumpo

University of Tennessee - Martin

Speakers
RM

Robbie Montgomery

University of Tennessee Martin


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B 1100

2:00pm

S14: Skills Students Need for Success After the Community College
Most chemistry students at a community college are aiming to transfer to a four-year college and complete a baccalaureate degree, apply to a professional health science program, or enter the workforce. All of these pathways require soft skills and thinking skills that are not part of the traditional chemistry curriculum but are essential for success. This symposium will discuss the skills students need to be taught to succeed and effective practices in instilling them.

Presider: Thomas Higgins, Harold Washington College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P91: Getting students on course (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P92: Improving lab reports through alternative activities (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P93: Best practices for implementing student group presentations (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P94: Community service to help students with necessary life skills (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P95: Identifying the experiences of transfer students in STEM to support development of a transfer learning community (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)

Moderators
TH

Thomas Higgins

Harold Washington College

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1114

2:00pm

S6: Impact of the Next Generation Science Standards on K-20 Chemical Education
The implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards should lead to a major shift in how science in general, and chemistry in particular, is experienced and learned by students. While the NGSS are K-12 standards, their impact will also be felt in higher education. Once students have developed deep, integrated scientific knowledge through their K-12 education, they may reasonably expect that their college courses will be an extension of the disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and practices with which they have become familiar. Traditional lecture-based college chemistry courses with decontextualized laboratories likely won’t be adequate to meet their needs. As such, the NGSS are a call for ALL chemistry educators to carefully consider their classroom and laboratory practices. In this symposium, we will start to consider how the NGSS will impact K-20 classrooms and how we as a community can support each other in implementing this new vision of chemistry education.

Presider: Amy Flangan Johnson and Oluwatobi Odeleye, Eastern Michigan University and South Dakota State University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P35: Iowa chemistry teachers' perceptions of NGSS and their professional development needs in light of a looming adoption of NGSS (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P36: Teachers' perceptions about a NGSS-inspired lesson (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P37: American Chemical Society education resources and NGSS (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P38: Identifying classroom resources that align with the Next Generation Science Standards (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P39: NGSS in middle school: Causal thinking about molecules and matter (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
Panel (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
AF

Amy Flanagan Johnson

Eastern Michigan University

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1112

2:00pm

W11: Building a Lab Manual
The workshop is designed for anyone who wants to create their own lab manual for use in their own classes but is unsure of how to proceed. It will begin with a review of the decisions that need to be made regarding the structure and content of the manual and then proceed to the dynamics of manual construction and experiment writing. Participants are asked to bring along an existing experiment they would like to be in their manual. It is expected that each participant will leave with one, usable experiment; a good idea of how to construct more and the basic structure of their future lab manual.

Moderators
SB

Steven Brown

Teacher of teachers, University of Arizona
I teach people how to teach chemistry to non-chemists. I also teach labs to freshmen. I'd love to talk about these issues and anything else related to teaching chemistry.

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 115

2:00pm

S12: Recognizing Excellence: Investigating a Recognition Program for Two-Year Colleges
ACS is investigating ways to recognize excellence in chemistry and chemistry-based technology education in two-year college programs. Any such framework needs to address the diversity of programs, student bodies, locations, structures, and available resources that make up the two-year college chemistry landscape. In this symposium, presentations, panel discussions, group discussions, and breakout sessions will be used to collect community input on such questions as: 1) Can two-year college programs benefit from ACS recognition? 2) How is excellence demonstrated in different types of programs? 3) How can excellence be recognized when there is no dedicated chemistry program? 4) What does excellence look like? How is it defined? 5) What can faculty do to document excellent practices at their institutions? Join the ACS Two-Year College Advisory Board in developing a recognition process that will strengthen the two-year college chemistry community and all of higher education.

Presider: Annemarie Ross, Rochester Institute of Technology/National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P76: Recognizing excellence in chemistry transfer programs, part I: ACS role and hallmarks of success (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P77: Recognizing excellence in chemistry transfer programs, part II: Demonstrating excellence (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P78: Recognizing excellence in chemistry-based technology programs, part I: ACS role and hallmarks of success (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P79: Recognizing excellence in chemistry-based technology programs, part II: Demonstrating excellence (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P80: Recognizing excellence in chemistry education for allied programs, part I: ACS role and hallmarks of success (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P81: Recognizing excellence in chemistry education for allied programs, part II: Demonstrating excellence (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P82: Recognizing excellence in two-year colleges: Development of a recognition program (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
AR

Annemarie Ross

Rochester Institute of Technology/National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Speakers
BA

Blake Aronson

Senior Education Associate, American Chemical Society
I work in the ACS Office of Two-Year Colleges. Please talk to me about student transfers, partnerships, ACS policies, and resources that can help two- and four-year college faculty and students.
NB

Neil Bastian

Salt Lake Community College


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1120

2:00pm

W45: Integrating a Learning to Learn One-credit course with General Chemistry
Pacific Crest has redesigned its intensive Learning to Learn Camp into a one-credit course that produces the same outcomes that the Learning to Learn Camp produces. This workshop will illustrate how by combining this one-credit course with a first term general chemistry course or with a Principles of Chemistry course, those students who consistently struggle with learning chemistry can improve the skills that excellent POGIL students exhibit: self-directed learning, critical thinking, generalization, problem solving, communication, writing to learn, teamwork, and self-assessment. The workshop will share a syllabus, stories, outcomes, and guidelines for structuring this integration.

Moderators
JG

John Goodwin

Professor, Coastal Carolina University

Speakers
DA

Daniel Apple

Pacific Crest


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 261

2:00pm

S10: Physical Chemistry Education Research
The purpose of this symposium is to explore research-in-progress and recent studies that offer new meanings to instructional approaches and student learning in the context of physical chemistry education. The presented research will provide a platform to demonstrate new contributions to our field, offer directions of future research in physical chemistry education, and discuss implications for curriculum practitioners, all based on a rigorous analysis of data. Topics are guided by, but not limited to, the themes of the 2014 CERP Special Issue on Physical Chemistry Education (see http://www.divched.org/content/chemistry-education-research-and-practice-cerp-call-papers). Each presentation will be 15 minutes with up to 4 minutes of questions from the audience. We will conclude the symposium with a panel of invited speakers to further the discussions about physical chemistry education research.  

Presider: Michael Mack, Purdue University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P62: Design, development and evaluation of the Thermochemistry Concept Inventory (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P63: Evaluating physical chemistry teaching methods using an original quantum chemistry concept inventory (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P64: Learning quantum chemistry via a visual-conceptual approach: Students' bidirectional textual and visual understanding (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P65: Incorporating particulate modeling for conceptualization of gas syringe (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P66: Update to the problem-solving mindset: Thoughts and observations from the trenches (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P67: Interactive engagement strategies for undergraduate physical chemistry (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P68: Using context and problem-based learning in the subject of thermodynamics (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm) WITHDRAWN
P69: Emergent themes of research in physical chemistry education (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm) WITHDRAWN

Moderators
MM

Michael Mack

PhD Candidate, Purdue University
I am a rising graduate student studying Chemistry Education Research at Purdue University. The kinds of research questions that are most interesting to me deal with how chemistry faculty instructional practices are aligned with their conceptions of teaching and learning, especially in upper-level course settings. Knowledge of instructional practices and conceptions is important for how DBER scholars may work more effectively with non-DBER... Read More →

Speakers
MT

Marcy Towns

Purdue University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LOH 164

2:00pm

W37: Hands-On NMR Activities for Undergraduates
This workshop will provide you with both theoretical and applied approaches to teaching NMR principles at the undergraduate and two-year college levels. A brief introduction to several NMR topics will be followed by hands-on activities where workshop participants will run several NMR experiments and interpret results. The aim is to encourage novel use of NMR instruction for undergraduate classes as all levels. Topics will include investigating “alternative nuclei” other than 1H and 13C, and an introduction to heteronuclear 2-dimensional NMR; 3-hour session.

Moderators
MW

Marshall Werner

Lake Superior State University

Speakers
CA

Charles Abrams

Truman College


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 109

2:00pm

S1: Big 10 Gen Chem Labs: Advances, Innovations, and Challenges
This symposium will provide a forum for discussing the current state of the general chemistry labs at universities in the Big 10 Conference. Topics of discussion, while aimed at large, research-oriented chemistry departments, will be relevant to most any other size chemistry department. This symposium invites presentations that outline any innovative approach to teaching general chemistry labs, whether successful or not. The organizers believe sharing both successes and failures will stimulate discussion and facilitate progress for all involved.

Presider: Joe Keiser, Penn State

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P1: If it's Tuesday this must be Belgium: Curriculum cycles in chemistry (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P2: Streamlining labs: Serving more with less (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P3: Quarters to semesters: Downsizing and detours (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm) [WITHDRAWN]
P4: Contextually relevant labs in an introductory chemistry sequence (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P5: Food science version of general chemistry lab (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P6: Integrating an electronic lab notebook and lab manual content: Using a flexible digital platform to facilitate problem-based experiments in general chemistry (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
Panel Discussion (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
JK

Joe Keiser

Penn State University

Speakers
MD

Michelle Driessen

University of Minnesota


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1138

2:00pm

S7: Integrating Green Chemistry Across the Curriculum: General and Organic Chemistry
This symposium will highlight the incorporation of green and sustainable chemistry across the curriculum.  The symposium will examine new classroom teaching modules/courses, learning methods and educational research, as well as laboratory experiments and experiences having their roots in the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry.  The symposium will focus on green chemistry materials designed to educate undergraduates at community colleges, four year colleges and graduate institutions.

Presider: Loyd Bastin, Widener University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P40: Pitfalls and (some) solutions for introducing green chemistry into the general chemistry lab (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P41: Developing green labs for general chemistry at large and small universities (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P42: Converting organic chemistry laboratory curriculum into green: Strategies, challenges and successes (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P43: Greening organic lab: A green chemistry module and mini-research project for organic chemistry students (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P44: Assessing learning gains in green chemistry labs (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P45: Examining student understanding of green chemistry metrics using the EcoScale (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P46: Steric effects in nucleophilic acyl substitutions: A green experiment for undergraduate students (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P47: Safe, easily constructed apparatus for liquid CO2 extractions (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
LB

Loyd Bastin

Widener University

Speakers
SS

Susan Sutheimer

Green Mountain College


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LMH 114

2:00pm

S8: Issues in Teaching and Learning in the Chemistry Laboratory
The purpose of this symposium is to provide a forum to discuss diverse approaches for teaching in the chemistry laboratory. Issues that may be addressed in this symposium include: the role of inquiry in the chemistry laboratory, the unique aspects of the laboratory which target specific learning objectives, the potential link between learning science in laboratory and lecture environments, and the practical constraints to providing quality laboratory experiences in diverse settings. Presenters are encouraged to report preliminary data on research in progress. Symposium presenters and the audience are also encouraged to pose questions for discussion on issues addressed during the session. A panel discussion will follow the presentations. 

Presider: Barbara L. Gonzalez, California State University Fullerton

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P48: New observational instrument for recording student interactions in a laboratory setting (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P49: Investigation of student-peer and student-TA discourse in problem-based organic chemistry lab: What is the influence of problem-type on the student experience? (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P50: Student perspectives of the undergraduate laboratory: Comparison between chemistry, physics and biology, between general and upper classes, and between US and Australia (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm) WITHDRAWN
P51: Student perceptions of a project-based organic chemistry laboratory (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P52: C3Lab: An integrated cognitive and conceptual curriculum for the general chemistry laboratory (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P53: CORE learning cycle: Anchoring analogical reasoning to the laboratory experience (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P54: Fostering student interest and promoting deep learning in a laboratory context: A case study in gas laws in first-year chemistry (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P55: Developing a community of researchers through shared experiences by first- and second-year students in the chemistry laboratory (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm) [WITHDRAWN]

Moderators
BL

Barbara L Gonzalez

California State University Fullerton

Speakers
KM

Kereen Monteyne

Northern Kentucky University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 123

2:00pm

W39: I Teach AP Chemistry-Are Inquiry Labs Necessary?
Research shows that students learn best through discovery. While cookbook labs are effective in verifying concepts, they are not as effective for student learning as Inquiry. The new AP Chemistry Curriculum mandates six Inquiry labs. The workshop goal is to provide participants with a "hands on" experience of moving from Cookbook thru Guided and, finally, towards Open Inquiry. Inquiry provides students the opportunity to develop their critical thinking skills to better prepare them for the challenges of the 21st Century. This goal can best be reached by realizing that this is a step-wise process that must be approached sequentially with adequate student preparation of laboratory and technology skills. The use of technology is another necessary piece of the puzzle since technology allows students to spend more time on actual Inquiry and less time with gathering, graphing, and analyzing collected data. The workshop will focus on two areas of Chemistry-spectrophotometry and Thermochemistry.

Moderators
GD

Greg Dodd

AP CHEMISTRY/HONORS CHEMISTRY, George Washington High School

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 377

2:00pm

W38: Hey! You Can’t teach It That Way! Overcoming Obstacles to Curricular Reform.
At CSB/SJU, we received NSF funding for “Connected Chemistry: An Inorganic, Organic and Biological Chemistry Approach” in which integrated foundation courses were developed. As we implemented cross-disciplinary courses, many shareholders were resistant to change. It was necessary to negotiate with faculty firmly embedded in their traditional disciplines as well as the biology department, education department, pre-health advisors, and the administration to ensure that our new courses fit the needs of various student groups. This workshop will cover aspects of the implementation of a new integrated curriculum, including faculty teaching cohorts, coordination of assessment plans, administrative collaborations, availability of resources and the use of differing pedagogical approaches. The CSB/SJU dean will help attendees brainstorm strategies for their home institutions. Workshop coordinators will use breakout sessions to catalyze discussion between people with similar curricular goals. Attendees will receive samples of activities from our courses and potential resources for supporting substantial curricular revision.

Moderators
BJ

Brian Johnson

College of St. Benedict/St. John's U

Speakers
KG

Kate Graham

College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University
RI

Richard Ice

College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University
HJ

Henry Jakubowski

Professor, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University
TN

T. Nicholas Jones

College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University
EM

Edward McIntee

Associate Professor, College of Saint Benedict/ Saint John's University
CS

Chris Schaller

College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 106

2:00pm

W49: Introduction to IONiC/VIPEr: Using and Sharing Inorganic Chemistry Education Resources
Inorganic chemistry finds its way into the curriculum at a variety of levels from general chemistry to upper division undergraduate courses. VIPEr (the Virtual Inorganic Pedagogical Electronic Resource) is a website (www.ionicviper.org) that provides a platform to share content and materials for teaching inorganic chemistry, while building a community of inorganic faculty known as IONiC. Workshop participants will be introduced to the IONiC community and will 1) learn how to find and adapt “learning objects” (in-class activity, literature discussion, laboratory, etc.) on VIPEr for teaching general chemistry and inorganic chemistry, 2) learn how to use the social networking features of VIPEr to give and receive support in teaching and research, and 3) learn how to design and upload a learning object to the site. Participants will be encouraged to bring a learning object and publish it on VIPEr by the end of the workshop.

Moderators
JS

Joanne Stewart

Hope College

Speakers
CN

Chip Natara

Lafayette College
LW

Lori Watson

Earlham College


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 117

2:00pm

S11: Preparing PUI Students for Success in Graduate School
Faculty at PUIs work closely with students over their academic career, but may be unaware of current trends in chemistry graduate school admissions. In order to advise and prepare students for successful graduate careers, faculty at PUIs need to be familiar with the non-curricular criteria that graduate admission committees desire in potential students. For example, how important are chemistry GRE scores? Are there minimum GPA requirements? How important is an undergraduate research experience? Do graduate schools tend to recruit from a geographic area? Do graduate admissions committees value other undergraduate experiences, such as lab assisting, tutoring, or supplemental peer instruction? In this symposium, we will bring together faculty at PUIs and faculty who participate in the graduate admissions process to share information and discuss their perspectives. A panel discussion will follow the presentations. 

Presider: Cheryl Frech, University of Central Oklahoma

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P70: Preparing students from PUIs for graduate school – one step at a time (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P71: Trouble with undergrads - getting them interested in graduate school (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P72: Preparing students for graduate study in chemistry—Grinnell College (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P73: Playing to your strengths: helping students get the most of a PUI education in chemistry (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P74: What Minnesota Twin Cities is looking for in graduate student applications (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P75: University of Oklahoma perspectives on graduate admission (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
Panel Discussion (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
CF

Cheryl Frech

University of Central Oklahoma

Speakers
LM

Luis Montes

Professor, University of Central Oklahoma


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK BLL 110

2:00pm

S2: cCWCS: Developing Faculty Communities to Transform Undergraduate Teaching and Learning
The Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops and Communities of Scholars program (cCWCS, NSF-TUES Type 3 Project #1022895) offers opportunities for college and university faculty to explore and refine new pedagogies and curriculum material. Topical workshops, which remain a central part of the project, are designed to provide a background of key areas of the chemical sciences along with pedagogical methods to introduce the topics into the undergraduate curriculum. The development of faculty communities through sponsorship of numerous miniworkshops, creation of topical web portals, and reunions, allows for the exchange of ideas, collaboration, and support for improving instruction in chemistry and related disciplines. This symposium will feature workshop alumni and instructors, and leaders of  topical communities. A particular emphasis is on how workshop participants have used workshop materials and follow-up activities to modify their classes, develop entirely new courses and establish new degree programs. For more information, please visit us at www.ccwcs.org.

Presider: David Collard, Georgia Institute of Technology

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P7: Interdisciplinary approach to teaching the chemistry of artist's materials (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P8: Chemistry and Art as an experiential course: teaching chemistry in the context of art to stimulate students' understanding of chemistry and interest in art (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P9: Chemistry in Art: Transformation of the chemistry curriculum (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P10: Development of a studio inorganic chemistry course (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P11: Impact of art and technology in chemistry laboratories at Anderson University (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P12: Integrating art and chemistry to develop conceptual understanding to real world applications (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P13: Integrating art with the physical sciences: Development of a liberal arts course (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P14: Molecular modernism: Interdisciplinary chemistry and art history study abroad courses in France (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
DC

David Collard

Georgia Institute of Technology

Speakers
PH

Patricia Hill

Millersville University
LK

Lawrence Kaplan

Williams College
JS

Jerry Smith

Georgia State University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 102

2:00pm

S3: Engaging Students in Organic Chemistry: Lecture Methods Emphasis
This symposium includes presentations of a variety of methods for engaging students in organic chemistry. These could range from individual creative activities to year-long methods of teaching using new pedagogies and anything in between. 

Presider: Barbara Murray, University of Redlands

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P15: Implementation of organic chemistry in the high school curriculum (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P16: Design and implementation of freshman organic chemistry via active learning (FOCAL) (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P17: Story telling historical top-down flipped approach with molecular essay exams (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P18: Teaching first semester organic chemistry based on similarities of reaction mechanisms: The organization you can use in your course (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P19: Constructivist approach to the general organic chemistry lecture course (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P20: Building a knowledge framework for organic chemistry students: A thematic approach to teaching (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P21: Who gives a darn? A guided inquiry workbook that improves student perceived relevance of organic chemistry (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P1039: Engaging everyone in a large lecture class: Lecture/POGIL hybrid, clickers, and classroom assessment (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
BM

Barbara Murray

Director of the Center for Science and Mathematics, University of Redlands
I have been teaching Organic Chemistry for 30 years. About 10 years ago I converted to POGIL and have continued doing group work because I think it is the best way for students to learn.

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LMH 176

2:00pm

W87: The POGIL Project Workshop: Introduction to POGIL
This session is designed for those with limited or no previous exposure to POGIL. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in POGIL activities, observe facilitation strategies firsthand, learn about POGIL classroom implementation, and discuss common barriers to implementation. After attending this session, participants will be able to: (1) name essential elements of POGIL pedagogy and philosophy, (2) list student learning outcomes supported in a POGIL classroom, and (3) create plans to begin implementation of POGIL in their own classrooms.

Moderators
GF

Gina Frey

Washington University in St. Louis

Speakers
BF

Brandon Fetterly

University of Wisconsin-Richland


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 119

2:00pm

W66: PhET Interactive Simulations Supporting Materials: Develop Inquiry-Based Learning Activities
The PhET Interactive Simulations project (http://phet.colorado.edu) has developed over 30 chemistry simulations (sims), which support student learning through scientist-like exploration and experimentation. Sims make the invisible visible, incorporate multiple representations, and emphasize connections between real life phenomena and the underlying science. PhET sims are designed to be flexible tools, and can be used for classroom demonstrations, clicker questions, guided inquiry activities, laboratory exercises, and homework. In each context, the supporting materials (eg. an activity sheet) can target specific process and content learning goals using the sims. In this workshop, participants will use guidelines and existing activities to develop supporting materials and facilitation plans to couple with sims in their teaching. This workshop is appropriate for those new to PhET, as well as seasoned sim users looking to design and receive feedback on new supporting materials. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Moderators
JC

Julia Chamberlain

University of Colorado Boulder
Finishing my third year at the University of Colorado with the PhET project, I am passionate about interactive engagement and using simulations to help students learn chemistry. This fall, I will begin teaching at a 2-year community college in the Los Angeles area. Come by booth #10 at the expo to chat with me about PhET Sims and teaching chemistry!

Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 111

2:00pm

S5: High School Teaching as a Profession
A recent longitudinal study of the US public high school chemistry teaching workforce indicates that this population is becoming increasingly less experienced and exhibiting a high rate of turnover. One way to improve retention is to develop communities of practice centered on activities that improve teaching and learning and facilitate continuous growth. In this symposium, we aim to identify ways in which teachers can grow and build a long-term teaching career in the face of the multiple challenges they face. Presentations in this symposium will explore the pathways of teachers who have engaged in activities that have positively shaped their perceptions of remaining in the career long-term, and highlight models for professional growth that can be applied across a range of school and state settings.

Presider: Debbie Herrington, Grand Valley State University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P29: Making connections in modeling instruction (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P30: Reflection as a process skill (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P31: Plan your own lessons (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P32: Teaching chemistry at a private high school: An inside look from a PhD (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P33: Gaining a voice in local and national education policy issues through collaborative relationships (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P34: Promoting teacher professional growth: perspectives from a scientific society (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
Panel (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
R

RUSHTON

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

Speakers
DH

Debbie Herrington

Professor of Chemistry, Grand Valley State University
DR

Doug Ragan

Hudsonville High School
EY

Ellen Yezierski

Miami University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK BLL 126

2:00pm

S13: Research in Chemistry Education
This symposium provides a forum for chemical education research. A submitted presentation should briefly address (1) the motivation for the research and type of problem investigated and (2) the methodology chosen to both gather and interpret the data collected. The presentation should focus primarily on the findings and the interpretation of the data. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS DivCHED Committee on Chemistry Education Research. 

Presider: Jessica VandenPlas, Grand Valley State University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P83: Uncovering students' incorrect scientific reasoning patterns (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P84: Chemistry research in the news: The effect of detailed descriptions of study limitations on public understanding (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P85: Comparison of life experiences of men and women in the sciences (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P86: “What we have here is a failure to communicate!": Students' use of multiple representations of organic reaction mechanisms (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P87: Identifying student experiences with molecular representational competence training technologies (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P88: Analyzing upper-level undergraduate biochemistry students' conceptual understanding of acid-base chemistry using different visual representations of titration curves (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P89: Cognitive affordances of multiple external representations in a virtual chemistry lab (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P90: Using eye-tracking to determine student reading patterns of multiple representations: Development of a novel time-sensitive principal component analysis (PCA/Eigenvector) approach (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
TP

Thomas Pentecost

Grand Valley State University

Speakers
JB

Jack Barbera

Associate Professor, University of Northern Colorado
The field of psychometrics dates back more than a century and is concerned with the theory and practice of psychological and educational measurement. Researchers in this field have established protocols to develop and evaluate a wide variety of assessment instruments, including multiple-choice concept inventories. With these protocols, chemists can make measurements of student knowledge and understanding with the same care and precision they... Read More →
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LTT 103

2:00pm

S4: Graduate Student Research in Chemical Education Research
This symposium aims to serve as a forum in which graduate students may share their work in chemical education research (CER), as well as a venue to network with other members of the CER community. The symposium consists of a series of presentations, each lasting 20 minutes, including two to four minutes for discussion. This is a great opportunity for graduate students in CER to gain feedback and suggestions on how to enhance the quality of their projects from more experienced researchers in the field. It is also a chance for the CER community to learn about new research ideas being explored by CER graduate students.

Presider: Lianne Schroeder, University of Illinois at Chicago and John Balyut, Iowa State University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P22: Exploring student understanding of mechanistic arrows (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P23: Analysis of student attitudes and comprehension in a discovery-based organic laboratory experiment (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P24: Predicting the products and mechanisms of the glycolysis process: An exploratory study of the impact of prior knowledge on student performance in biochemistry (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P25: Uncovering the topic-specific pedagogical content knowledge of high school chemistry teachers (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P26: Probing disciplinary differences in open-ended problem solving (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P27: Inverted instruction: Results from a longitudinal study of a hybrid SCALE-UP model for large general chemistry courses (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P28: Adaptation variations in instructional strategies and implications for future research (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
avatar for Lianne Schroeder

Lianne Schroeder

University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
JB

John Baluyut

Iowa State University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HON 148 HON 148

2:00pm

S17: Web-Based Resources for Chemical Education
This symposium seeks presentations on resources that can be obtained over the Internet, and ways they can be utilized for the teaching and learning of chemistry. We are seeking presentations that address perspectives of development and implementation of web based technologies, and their applications to classroom, hybrid and online learning environments. Topics such as the application of mobile devices, and how social networking and semantic web technologies are influencing chemical education are also encouraged. The objective of this symposium is to provide educators and developers opportunities to share resources and experiences. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Presider: John H. Penn, West Virginia University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P110: Moodle and the high school classroom (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P111: Using ChemCollective materials in your flipped classroom (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P112: Web-Based learning tools for organic chemistry (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P113: ChemDraw for iPad as a tool for classroom engagement (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P114: Flexible tools for student learning in online learning environments (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P115: Bringing student-student interactions online: Computer-moderated online discussions of intermolecular forces (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P116: Meeting students where they are: utilizing Facebook as a class discussion board and for virtual office hours (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
RE

Robert E. Belford

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Speakers
JH

Jonathan H. Gutow

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
JH

John H. Penn

West Virginia University - Morgantown


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LTT 102

2:00pm

W101: Beyond the Homework: Authoring Interactive Tutorials In the WebAssign System
On-line homework has become a familiar feature of most introductory college courses. Now they do the homework, but are they doing the assigned reading? Imagine a world where the students were assigned an interactive reading that you created. With students reading and answering questions prior to coming to class, you start the lecture on firm ground or can even flip part of the class. What does this cost the student? If you are already using WebAssign, the answer is nothing. This workshop will show how the WebAssign homework system can be used to write interactive tutorials. Topics will include formatting to give a professional look, inclusion of figures, videos, randomization and more. Examples will be drawn from a privately authored general chemistry textbook written entirely in WebAssign, but the applications go well beyond chemistry. The workshop is most beneficial to those with some experience writing questions in WebAssign. Time will be provided to work on a project of your design.

Moderators
SM

Steven Matchett

Grand Valley State University

Speakers
MS

Mark Santee

WebAssign


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 113

2:00pm

W95 Ultimate Jmol
In this workshop for experienced users of Jmol, we will focus on more advanced aspects of Jmol and JavaScript scripting, including what's new for Jmol 14.0, the issue of Java vs. HTML5, and cross-browser compatibility. Participants should bring examples of pages using Jmol or at least be prepared to go behind the scenes with ones provided in order to work on some of the more challenging aspects of using Jmol on the web. The JSmol framework will be described fully. Participants will learn how to coordinate Jmol with other apps, including JSpecView (NMR, IR, UV/Vis, Raman, MS) and JSME (2D drawing). Presented by the principal developer of Jmol.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hanson

St. Olaf College

Speakers
DJ

Dean Johnston

Otterbein University


Sunday August 3, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 114

3:30pm

W68: Ward's Chemistry In-the-Bag Activities and NGSS
Fun, hands-on, and mess-free, Ward's Chemistry In-the-Bag activities are the ideal way to kick-start a new chemistry topic, or reinforce key condepts at the end of a unit.  Experience these Ward's Science exclusive activites in action and learn how they alig to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Moderators
Speakers

Sunday August 3, 2014 3:30pm - 5:00pm
LTT 101
 
Monday, August 4
 

9:30am

W63: Non-Visual Methodologies for Teaching Multi-Sensory Chemistry Lab Activities (offered twice)
This workshop will feature methodologies and techniques for teaching chemistry lab activities in a hands-on way without the use of vision. The activities are valuable to all learners, though they are designed for students with visual impairments. Multi-channel sensory feedback through tactile, olfactory, and hearing in addition to vision will be discussed and featured in the various activities as part of this workshop. Concerns related to laboratory safety regarding students with visual impairments and other disabilities will also be addressed. A combination of high tech and low tech solutions for science access for all learners will be featured. This workshop will demonstrate aspects of the Science Activities for the Visually Impaired (SAVI) curriculum published by the Laurence Hall of Science from the 1970s, and how these techniques are valuable in today’s science curriculum. Further, commercially available technologies of audible and talking lab tools will also be presented.

Moderators
CS

Cary Supalo

Illinois State University

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am
PAD 376

9:30am

W20: Comparing Personally Written Test Items with ACS Exams Items
This workshop is designed to allow participants view the developing interface that will allow instructors to compare student perfomance on their own test items with national samples of student perfomances on ACS test items on the same topic. The comparison is based on the Anchoring Concepts Content Map (ACCM) for General Chemistry (JCE, 89, 721, 2012). 2000 test items from the past 20 years of general chemistry exams from ACS Exams have been aligned to the ACCM. The interface will help identify probably maps for an entered test item, allow the user to confirm a particular content area, and then provide comparison information about student performance. Feedback from participants will be used to provide features that will enhance the utility of this tool as it is developed. (Note this project is funded by the National Science Foundation.)

Moderators
TH

Thomas Holme

Iowa State University

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 111

9:30am

S28: NSF Programs that Support Undergraduate Education
This Symposium will feature speakers whose projects have been funded by the National Science Foundation to support undergraduate education.   These projects (TUES, ATE, NSDL, Noyce Scholarship Program, S-STEM, etc.) have developed new educational materials, new strategies for delivering educational material, meaningful evaluation of learning gains, means to support faculty development, scholarships for STEM students, and so forth, all aimed toward improving the learning of chemistry or other STEM disciplines by undergraduate students with diverse backgrounds and career aspirations. A NSF Program Officer will present an overview of current NSF programs and will participate in a question/answer session.

Presider: Robert Boggess, Radford University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P236: Overview of programs in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education that support chemistry education (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P237: Expanding opportunities for photonics education and training in Michigan (9:55 am to 10:15 am) WITHDRAWN
P238: Noyce Scholars Program at Truman State University (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P239: Small colleges, big bucks: A multi-institution collaboration on an NSF-TUES Type II award (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P240: WIDER (EAGER) program: GVSU inventory of instructional practices (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P241: Creating opportunities and access in science and technology (COAST): An NSF S-STEM program at Knox College (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
RB

Robert Boggess

Radford University

Speakers
CB

Cindy Burkhardt

Radford University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B2110

9:30am

S25: How Do We Know What Students Know?
A major factor determining what someone can learn is what they already know. As such, it is important for educators to glean what information they can about what prior knowledge students have when they come into their classrooms. Additionally, much of educational research focuses on assessing and/or improving student learning outcomes. But what do we really know about what's happening inside of the minds of our students? No one knows exactly what someone else is thinking. Instead, we often interpret and infer what students know based on what they say or do. This symposium will provide a platform for researchers and educators to discuss underlying theories, methodologies, assessments, and analyses aimed at understanding how we think we know what students know. 

Presider: Thomas Bussey, University of Nevada Las Vegas

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P216: What we see may not be what is! (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P217: What were they thinking when they drew that? (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P218: Manipulatives as a tool for understanding what is in the black box (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P219: "I'm an electron, and you're the nucleus:" Using representations to design particulate nature of matter activities for elementary students (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P220: Eye tracking conceptual problems in stoichiometry (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P221: Can log files from student problem solving in open-ended environments reveal student's strategies and goals, thereby providing a scalable alternative to think-aloud studies? (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P222: What do pre-service elementary school teachers know about the particulate nature of matter and phase changes? (11:50 am to 12:10 pm) [WITHDRAWN]
P223: Alignment of students' problem-solving strategies with expert practices and instruction in general chemistry classrooms (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
TB

Thomas Bussey

University of California, San Diego

Speakers
SR

Stephanie Ryan

American Institutes for Research


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LOH 164

9:30am

S23: General Papers: Engaging Students Through Classroom Activities, Demonstrations, and Extracurriculars
Submissions to this session are encouraged from presenters that feel that their work does not fit into any of the predefined symposia. 

Presider: Jessica VandenPlas, Grand Valley State University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P203: Addition of space-related demonstrations to chemistry outreach shows (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P204: After the classic ammonium chloride demo: Some really interesting stuff is going on in there (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P205: Development of interest in chemistry through miraculous demonstrations (10:15 am to 10:35 am) WITHDRAWN
P206: Valence Pictionary: An activity for formal charge (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P207: Before, change, after: A modeling approach to stoichiometry (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P208: Comparison of carbon dioxide emissions from electric vehicles to emissions from internal combustion vehicles (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P209: Readiness for graduate school: How? (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
ASH 2302

9:30am

S22: Food Chemistry
This symposium will explore how educators use food to heighten student interest in chemistry.  Submissions should highlight either examples of novel course design using food chemistry, or else novel uses of food in the classroom to stimulate interest.  Submissions are welcome from all levels of chemical education.  This symposium is sponsored by cCWCS.

Presider: Keith Symcox, University of Tulsa

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P197: Fighting with food counteracting environmental toxicants (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P198: Accounting for taste: Stoichiometry in a Culinary Chemistry class (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P199: Incorporating food sampling into an organic and biochemistry course for non-majors (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P200: Marshmallows and fluff: exploring polymers in general and physical chemistry courses (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P201: Bev-O-Metrics: An NMR analysis of beverages for caffeine (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P202: Beer and coffee in the Instrumental Analysis lab (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
Panel (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
KS

Keith Symcox

University of Tulsa

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 102

9:30am

S26: Interdisciplinary Chemistry Courses: Integrating Chemistry and ....
At the undergraduate level, an awareness of the importance of interdisciplinary connections has increased significantly in the last few years and a number of institutions have attempted to combine the traditional chemistry course or even whole programs with other subjects such as, but not limited to, biology, physics and mathematics. Integration of chemistry and another subject(s) can happen in either the laboratory environment, the lecture or both with a particular challenge lying in being able to mesh the separate courses seamlessly. The integrated courses generally aim to increase the interdisciplinary awareness of participating students, strengthening connections between the disciplines and giving a bigger picture awareness. Of course, this integration poses particular challenges such as not sacrificing the materials that would be obtained from taking the courses separately but the potential rewards are significant and this symposium is designed to discuss these.

Presider: Graeme Wyllie, Concordia College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P224: Science One: An interdisciplinary first-year science program (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P225: Constellation courses: Learning across disciplines (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P226: Interdisciplinary courses for non-majors: “SEEing Science in Appalachia" (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P227: Integrating chemistry and biology through theme based courses for non-majors (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P228: ChemBio – An integration of chemistry and biology labs for college freshmen (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P229: Integrating an authentic research experience across multiple chemistry and biology lab courses at Otterbein University (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P230: Molecules of emotion: Chemistry and psychology (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P1040: The Chemistry and Biology of Brewing: An Interdisciplinary Course (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
GW

Graeme Wyllie

Concordia College

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1165

9:30am

W99: Using Threshold Concepts to Improve Student Learning in Undergraduate Biochemistry
Threshold concepts are concepts that when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress. They are therefore essential for learning. By focusing on threshold concepts, instructors can maximize the impact of instruction. During this workshop, participants will be introduced to what is known about threshold concepts in biochemistry and how these concepts relate to prerequisite coursework. Workshop participants will contribute to a community-based effort to create instructional and assessment tools to support undergraduate students in gaining a deeper understanding of selected biochemical threshold concepts. Participation in this process will provide faculty the resources and skills needed to begin to change their instruction to better address learning of these vital concepts. Those who teach undergraduate biochemistry as well as those who teach prerequisite courses for biochemistry (general chemistry, organic chemistry, general biology) are encouraged to attend the workshop.

Moderators
JL

Jennifer Loertscher

Seattle University

Speakers
VM

Vicki Minderhout

Seattle University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 106

9:30am

S27: Liberal Arts Content and Pedagogy in the Chemistry Classroom: Making Connections Between Disciplines
The goal of this symposium is to discuss implementation of content and teaching approaches from the liberal arts into chemistry classes. Interdisciplinary connections in chemistry classes can help engage students and promote higher-order learning. Strategies for bringing material from humanities and social sciences into chemistry lectures and laboratories through themed courses or specific class activities will be presented. Teaching strategies adapted from non-science disciplines, such as discussion-based lecture, group work, and writing assignments, will be discussed. Speakers are encouraged to address challenges in incorporating liberal arts teaching strategies and the impact that these techniques have on student learning and engagement. Submissions from all levels of chemistry courses, including non-majors and high school courses, are encouraged. 

Presider: Kathryn D. Kloepper, Mercer University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P231: Enriching the chemistry curriculum with in-depth experiences (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P232: Teaching the history of civilization with the chemistry of materials (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P233: Building up STEAM: A cross-disciplinary course between visual arts and chemistry (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P234: Science based approaches to the first-year liberal arts seminar course (10:35 am to 10:55 am) WITHDRAWN
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P235: Teaching chemistry to prisoners and nonmajors to avoid "Breaking Bad" (11:10 am to 11:30 am)

Moderators
KD

Kathryn D. Kloepper

Mercer University

Speakers
GL

Garland L. Crawford

Mercer University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1112

9:30am

W81: Workshop Using the ChemConnections Workbook (offered twice)
How does a nuclear reactor work? How is nylon formed? What is in my blood? This session will introduce activities from the new ChemConnections Activity Workbook that includes 59 classroom tested activities written in the context of societal and environmental issues. Derived from the ChemConnections modules, the collection of individual activities and laboratories allow real-world problems to be integrated into a broad range of teaching environments including lectures, recitations, and workshop based courses. Designed with attention to pedagogy and student learning styles, these activities introduce real-world applications utilizing a variety of methods including data analysis, laboratory, guided inquiry, and discovery. Ultimately these activities assist students in not only learning general chemistry, but also in understanding how chemistry relates to modern issues such as acid rain, nuclear energy, nutrition, and technology.

Moderators
SA

sharon anthony

Northland college

Speakers
KB

Kevin Braun

Beloit College
HM

Heather Mernitz

Alverno College


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1123

9:30am

W27: Engineering-The Missing Piece of the Puzzle!
Join this “hands on” workshop and learn how to implement STEM instruction in the Chemistry classroom. Our present and future lives are dependent upon making America more competitive by training a STEM-educated work force. Presently, the STEM subjects are usually taught independently of each other. STEM Instruction must be cross-curricular and make use of 21st Century Skills and Technology. Most teachers have little difficulty integrating science, mathematics, and technology into their courses. The difficult piece of the puzzle is engineering. Many teachers misunderstand and fear engineering. This workshop focuses on Engineering Design-one of the NGSS Science and Engineering Practices. The goal of this workshop is to ease teachers’ concerns by their participation in a “hands on” STEM activity to understand how a colorimeter works and to design and use a simple colorimeter. Spectrophotometry is one of the areas now being emphasized in the AP Chemistry Curriculum. Handouts will be provided.

Moderators
GD

Greg Dodd

AP CHEMISTRY/HONORS CHEMISTRY, George Washington High School

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 377

9:30am

W70: Putting the Green in the Next Generation Science Standards
Join us for an interactive hands-on workshop on how to incorporate and align green and sustainable chemistry with the new generation science standards in your daily teaching. Learn from a team of high school teachers involved in ‘Putting the Green in the Next Generation Science Standards” a project organized by the Michigan Green Chemistry Clearinghouse, GVSU Chemistry Department, and the Regional Math and Science Center, and by Beyond Benign, an organization known world-wide for its vision to revolutionize the way chemistry is taught and learned. Be prepared to walk away with useful tools and resources to bring back to your classrooms and laboratories.

Moderators
DK

Dalila Kovacs

Associate Professor of Chemistry, GVSU
Dalila is one of the team leaders that designed and developed the Michigan Green Chemistry Clearinghouse, a virtual hub for green chemistry resource meant to advance the adoption of green chemistry in multiple sectors throughout the state, a project supported by the MI Governor’s Executive Directive 2006-6 “Promotion of Green Chemistry for Sustainable Economic Development and Protection of Public Health,” the Michigan Green Chemistry... Read More →

Speakers
KA

Kate Anderson

@beyondbenign
AC

Amy Cannon

Executive Director, Beyond Benign
Amy is the Executive Director of Beyond Benign, a non-profit organization dedicated to green chemistry education. Amy holds the world's first Ph.D. in Green Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts Boston, a MS in Chemistry from UMass Boston, and a BA in Chemistry from Saint Anselm College. At Beyond Benign her work focuses on chemistry education to better prepare students and scientists to enter the workforce trained with the skills to... Read More →
KB

Kathe Blue Hetter

Science Department Chair, Skyline High School
TP

Thomas Pentecost

Grand Valley State University
RS

Ryan Schoenborn

Coopersville High School


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 206

9:30am

S18: Adapting to Emerging Trends: Revision of the ACS Guidelines for Chemistry in Two-Year College Programs
The two-year college chemistry landscape is a rich and varied arena. Since 1970, ACS has provided guidelines to support excellence in two-year college programs. Last updated in 2009, the ACS Guidelines for Chemistry in Two-Year Colleges has provided a highly flexible model that addresses the challenges faced in a wide variety of two-year chemistry transfer, technology, and support systems. Starting in 2014, the Guidelines will be revised to address emerging trends in the higher education landscape. This symposium will address the role of the Guidelines in two-year college chemistry education, changes in the landscape over the past five years, and the process for keeping the Guidelines current. Through presentations and discussions, participants will have the opportunity to share their thoughts on changes needed to keep the Guidelines current with the needs of the community.

Presider: Susan Shih, College of DuPage

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P166: Role of ACS Guidelines in two-year college chemistry education (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P167: Impact of distance education on the two-year college landscape (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P168: Teaching and assessing employability or student skills in the chemistry curriculum (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P169: Addressing chemistry-based technology and other applied chemistry programs in ACS guidelines (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P170: Addressing laboratory safety and standards at two-year colleges (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P171: Addressing teaching loads and contact hours at two-year colleges (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P172: Implementing ACS guidelines in two-year colleges (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
SS

Susan Shih

College of DuPage

Speakers
JS

Joan Sabourin

American Chemical Society


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A2121

9:30am

S20: Enriching Professional Preparation of Students: Vertical Skill Integration and Capstone Experiences
The 2014 edition of the ACS Guidelines for Bachelor Degree Programs will strongly encourage approved programs to require that their certified chemistry majors participate in a capstone experience.  An important aspect of this integrative experience is the opportunity it provides programs to assess their students’ ability to integrate knowledge, use the chemical literature and demonstrate effective communication skills. In this CPT-sponsored symposium, we will explore possible approaches for providing such experiences and for using these experiences in the assessment of certified majors.  The symposium will consist of a combination of invited and contributed talks as well as small group discussion among the participants.  The ACS Committee on Professional Training expects that a broad range of approaches could be taken to provide students with appropriate capstone experiences.  Examples include undergraduate research, an advanced laboratory course, a more traditional skill-focused capstone course, or a mentored teaching experience.  The CPT hopes to use this symposium to simulate discussion of how professional development of students could be promoted through such upper-level skill-focused experiences.

Presider: Anne McCoy, The Ohio State University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P181: Advanced Synthesis and Spectroscopy – Lessons learned from designing a capstone course (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P182: Putting an emphasis on research in the curriculum: A year-long capstone research course serves as the keystone for the neuroscience minor program at Hope College (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P183: Developing commercial awareness in a chemistry curriculum (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P184: Senior chemistry capstone experience at the University of Evansville: Lessons in life -long learning, professionalism, and philanthropy (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P185: Presentation of the capstone experience in chemistry at the University of Cincinnati (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P186: From stepping stones to capstone: Skill development in the chemistry senior seminar (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P187: Senior Individualized Project as a capstone experience (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P188: Integrating student skills into a crowded curriculum: What have we leaned from this symposium? (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
AM

Anne McCoy

The Ohio State University

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A2117

9:30am

S19: Authentic Research Experiences in the First and Second Year Curriculum: Focus on General Chemistry
Authentic research experiences allow students to practice being scientists; to be exposed to the way chemists approach problems, how knowledge is acquired, and the use of evidence to support that knowledge. The ability to embrace uncertainty, not knowing the “right” answer, is an integral aspect of this experience, but it is often a difficult process for freshmen and sophomores. This symposium invites discussion on the use of authentic research projects in the first and second year laboratory curriculum. Presentations should include important aspects of the successful incorporation of research projects into the curriculum as well as the challenges faced in the development of the program. The inclusion of tools used in the assessment of student gains related to the development of scientific inquiry skills is also encouraged.

Presider: Nichole Powell, Oxford College of Emory University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P173: Incorporating an original research project into a General Chemistry II laboratory class (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P174: Experimental design as a mechanism for exposing first-year chemistry students to an authentic scientific research experience (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P175: Utilizing an active learning approach to create authentic research experiences for first-year chemistry majors (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P176: Introduction to Research: engaging first and second-year science majors in research through a multidisciplinary course (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P177: Early authentic research projects and teaching the nature of science (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P178: Increasing student decision-making in an in-class research experience (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P179: Assessing the effectiveness of a first-year undergraduate research methods course designed to give students an authentic research experience (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P180: Developing an introduction to scientific research course at a rural community college (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
NP

Nichole Powell

Oxford College of Emory University

Speakers
BH

Brenda Harmon

Oxford College of Emory University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1100

9:30am

W5: AP Chemistry Inquiry and Forensic Laboratory Manual
Here is an AP lab workshop that will satisfy virtually all of your desires; over forty-five inquiry and forensic based lab activities that parallel those now recommended (or required) by the College Board. The available manual contains detailed teacher notes, pictures of setups and sample data and calculations. All experiments have been correlated to a primary learning objective(s) and science practices as outlined in the College Board Curriculum Framework for AP Chemistry. An appendix now lists additional questions (with answers) teachers can ask students either during a pre-lab session or a post-lab analysis. Participants will have an opportunity to do several of the experiments contained within the lab manual.

Moderators
JB

Jesse Bernstein

Miami Country Day School

Speakers
JB

Jeffrey Bracken

Westerville North High School
PP

Paul Price

Trinity Valley School


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 205

9:30am

S24: Guided, Guided Inquiry Labs
Learning how to teach guided inquiry labs can be difficult even for the most experienced teachers. For new teaching assistants it can be an impossible assignment. Without proper guidance the guided inquiry lab can result in a horrible experience for both students and TA.  The symposium will discuss methods for guiding (training) teaching assistants to run guided inquiry labs, problems associated with using teaching assistants to lead guided inquiry labs and examples of successful solutions.

Presider: Steven Brown, University of Arizona

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P210: Incorporating guided-inquiry learning into the organic chemistry laboratory (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P211: How cCWCS and guided inquiry laboratories helped a small community college obtain grant funding (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P212: Writing lab reports one section at a time (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P213: Guided inquiry in chemistry: Teaching assistant training courses for undergraduates (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P214: TA training: What to do for guided-inquiry laboratories? (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P215: Incorporating successful guided inquiry in a TA taught program (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
SB

Steven Brown

Teacher of teachers, University of Arizona
I teach people how to teach chemistry to non-chemists. I also teach labs to freshmen. I'd love to talk about these issues and anything else related to teaching chemistry.

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1117

9:30am

S7: Integrating Green Chemistry Across the Curriculum: General and Organic Chemistry
This symposium will highlight the incorporation of green and sustainable chemistry across the curriculum.  The symposium will examine new classroom teaching modules/courses, learning methods and educational research, as well as laboratory experiments and experiences having their roots in the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry.  The symposium will focus on green chemistry materials designed to educate undergraduates at community colleges, four year colleges and graduate institutions.

Presider: Sarah Kennedy, Westminster College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P136: Green synthesis of renewable, sustainable polymers for the organic chemistry laboratory (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P137: Guided inquiry experiment for teaching thermochemical concepts based on green chemistry principles (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P138: Enriching a sophomore-level organic chemistry lab course with a green reaction that requires students to use spectroscopy skills (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P139: Recycling of plastics: Integrating service learning and green chemistry in the organic chemistry curriculum at North Park University (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P140: Straightforward procedure using bleach for the green oxidation of alcohols (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P141: Comparison of green and standard aldol condensations in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P142: Quantifying waste in undergraduate organic laboratories via the aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
LB

Loyd Bastin

Widener University

Speakers
SS

Susan Sutheimer

Green Mountain College


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LMH 114

9:30am

S8: Issues in Teaching and Learning in the Chemistry Laboratory
The purpose of this symposium is to provide a forum to discuss diverse approaches for teaching in the chemistry laboratory. Issues that may be addressed in this symposium include: the role of inquiry in the chemistry laboratory, the unique aspects of the laboratory which target specific learning objectives, the potential link between learning science in laboratory and lecture environments, and the practical constraints to providing quality laboratory experiences in diverse settings. Presenters are encouraged to report preliminary data on research in progress. Symposium presenters and the audience are also encouraged to pose questions for discussion on issues addressed during the session. A panel discussion will follow the presentations. 

Presider: Barbara L. Gonzalez, California State University Fullerton

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P143: Enhancing advanced analytical chemistry students' laboratory experience in a round-robin style course using pre-laboratory videos and quizzes (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P144: Delivering general chemistry pre-laboratory content though student produced videos at Millikin University (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P145: Use and evaluation of computerized pre-laboratory experiments (CPLEX) for the organic chemistry laboratory (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P146: Teaching methods, where do they fit in? A study into the teaching laboratory (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P147: Determining the chemical formula of unknown crystals as a semester-long inquiry theme for general chemistry lab (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P148: Undergraduate research laboratory experience projects as a platform for designing new inter-disciplinary upper level chemistry experiments (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P149: Three step incremental implementation of a new curriculum in large enrollment undergraduate organic laboratories (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P150: Use of water quality tests as a foundation for a more inquiry-based general chemistry laboratory (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
BL

Barbara L Gonzalez

California State University Fullerton

Speakers
KM

Kereen Monteyne

Northern Kentucky University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 123

9:30am

W14: cCWCS Miniworkshop: Food Chemistry (offered twice)
Exploring Chemistry through Food makes science fun and approachable to a student while providing an endless array of everyday examples to teach chemical concepts to Chemistry majors and non-majors alike. This mini-workshop will provide the participants with hands-on activities, demonstrations, discovery-based lessons, and small experiments that will focus on chemical transformations using food. Basic chemical concepts such as pH, color, nature of heat & energy will be explored in addition to cutting-edge molecular gastronomy techniques that will excite faculty and students alike. Participants will take home materials they can plug into various courses and labs.

Moderators
SM

Sunil Malapati

Clarke University

Speakers
SR

Subha Ranjan Das

Canegie Mellon University
EP

Elizabeth Pollock

Richard Stockton College of NJ


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 107

9:30am

W33: Getting Students to make Evidence Based Claims: Principles of Running an Argument Driven Inquiry (ADI) or a Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) Laboratory
Inquiry and argumentation are complementary goals that make laboratory experiences more scientifically authentic and educative for students (Berland & Reiser, 2009; Jimenez-Aleixandre, 2008; Osborne, 2010). Currently, there is an emphasis in laboratory instruction to move students toward making evidence based claims through instructional models that give a more central place to argumentation and its role in the social construction of scientific knowledge. This is not a simple adjustment for students or instructors given that challenges still exist even when implementing an inquiry-based laboratory. This workshop will focus on two specific approaches to laboratory instruction: Argument Driven Inquiry (ADI) (Walker & Sampson, 2013) and the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) (Poock, et al., 2007). Participants will be introduced to each approach, engage in activities that compare the approaches and lead mock ADI and SWH discussion sessions to practice elements of these two instructional methods.

Speakers
MV

Mary van Opstal

Graduate Student, Loyola University Chicago
EP

Elizabeth Pulliam

Tallahassee Community College
JW

Joi Walker

Tallahassee Community College


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1221

9:30am

W1: A cCWCS Miniworkshop on Computational Chemistry for Chemistry Educators (offered twice)
This workshop will explore various ways that computers can be used to enhance and expand the educational experience of students enrolled in the high school or undergraduate chemistry curriculum. Brief discussions and extensive hands-on laboratory exercises of web-based molecular modeling and visualization software will be presented. No previous expertise with computational chemistry is expected.

Moderators
SC

Shawn C. Sendlinger

North Carolina Central University

Speakers
EB

Elisabeth Bell-Loncella

University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown
CR

Clyde R. Metz

College of Charleston


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 116

9:30am

W36: Hands-On Models for Solids
The spatial arrangement of atoms is central to the understanding of structure and properties. Hands-on manipulation of physical models is fundamental to understanding the three-dimensional atomic nature of materials, even with the availability of increasingly sophisticated computer displays. During the workshop we will make use of four different physical model kits based on hub and spoke (especially useful for covalent bonding), sphere packing (especially useful for ionic structures), polyhedral coordination (especially useful for oxides and environmental chemistry), and magnetic attraction (especially useful for showing the energetics of bond formation and addressing the common misconception among students that all bond formation requires energy.) Is a tetrahedron four spokes from a central atom, the space between four close-packed spheres, or a structural unit used to assemble larger structures? Multiple representations provide complementary views. We will also use some online models that allow switching between representations.

Moderators
GL

George Lisensky

Beloit College

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1117

9:30am

S29: Providing Supplemental Help to Struggling Students
Most campuses have a way for students to get supplemental tutoring for science classes.  These resources are an invaluable tool for helping students understand Chemistry concepts and often provide a place for focused learning.  Some students go in for a quick question and other should bring a sleeping bag.  Unfortunately, there aren’t many opportunities for those involved with science learning centers, tutoring, and supplemental instruction to come together and share best practices.  This symposium will showcase tutoring at various institutions including their best practices and struggles.

Presider: Heather Sklenicka, Rochester Community and Technical College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P242: Improving student learning with Supplemental Instruction (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P243: Success of Supplemental Instruction: Peer assisted study sessions strengthen student performance in undergraduate chemistry courses (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P244: Assessment of an embedded lead tutor program in Chemistry for the Allied Health Sciences courses (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P245: Challenges of measuring success in Supplemental Instruction: The role of student motivation (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P246: Hermeneutic analysis of the Supplemental Instruction (SI) leader experience (11:10 am to 11:30 am) WITHDRAWN
P247: Denver Metro Chem Scholars a new NSF S-STEM program at a large urban PUI (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
HS

Heather Sklenicka

Rochester Community and Technical College

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1151

9:30am

S3: Engaging Students in Organic Chemistry: Class Activities Emphasis
This symposium includes presentations of a variety of methods for engaging students in organic chemistry. These could range from individual creative activities to year-long methods of teaching using new pedagogies and anything in between. 

Presider: Barbara Murray, University of Redlands

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P117: Concept maps: Helping students connect the dots in organic chemistry (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P118: Using Think Alouds to understand from the students' perspective: What did they really learn from our reaction mechanism animations? (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P119: Mental hooks: Creative techniques to enhance retention of key concepts in organic chemistry (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P120: Innovative and time economic methodology for the identification of aromatic and anti-aromatic organic compounds (10:35 am to 10:55 am) WITHDRAWN
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P121: Design and presentation of a multistep synthetic scheme: A culminating activity for organic chemistry students (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P122: Case studies of historical research challenges in organic chemistry: Development of cationic polymerization (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P123: Enhancing students' understanding in organic chemistry (11:50 am to 12:10 pm) WITHDRAWN

Moderators
BM

Barbara Murray

Director of the Center for Science and Mathematics, University of Redlands
I have been teaching Organic Chemistry for 30 years. About 10 years ago I converted to POGIL and have continued doing group work because I think it is the best way for students to learn.

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LMH 176

9:30am

W88: The POGIL Project Workshop: Introduction to POGIL
This session is designed for those with limited or no previous exposure to POGIL. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in POGIL activities, observe facilitation strategies firsthand, learn about POGIL classroom implementation, and discuss common barriers to implementation. After attending this session, participants will be able to: (1) name essential elements of POGIL pedagogy and philosophy, (2) list student learning outcomes supported in a POGIL classroom, and (3) create plans to begin implementation of POGIL in their own classrooms.

Moderators
MP

Marty Perry

Ouachita Baptist University

Speakers
AH

Amy Hanson

Teacher, Denver Public Schools
I love teaching science, especially chemistry. I currently teach chemistry and AP Chemistry at East High School. When I'm not at school, I love to run, swim, bike, hike, cook and garden.


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 119

9:30am

S21: Flipping the Classroom: General Chemistry, Part 1
The flipped classroom facilitates active engagement between students and teachers during class time, usually through the use of technology to present material to students before the concepts are discussed in class.  This innovative pedagogical method is used by educators ranging from elementary school through college.  There are many different technological tools used to implement this pedagogical method.  Some educators pre-record lectures of themselves presenting material, others use screen casts to convey information to students before attending class in order to facilitate more peer-to-peer learning, and some teachers use a flipped classroom approach that does not involve videos.  Ultimately, the shift in learning is focused on changing the classroom from passive to active.  The focus of our symposium will be about how teachers use the face-to-face class time gained by changing from a completely lecture based classroom.  This symposium is sponsored by the CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education. 

Presider: Chris Luker, Highland Local Schools

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P189: Building from investment: Using metacognition and comprehension to fuel higher level learning (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P190: Flipping: Student buy-in (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P191: Flipped vs. traditional general chemistry: What did students think and how did they do? (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P192: Less class time, more learning (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P193: Partial flipping to enhance lecture delivery (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P194: Semi-flipped general chemistry (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P195: Advantages and disadvantages of flipping the general chemistry classroom: A three year study (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P196: How cognitive science favors (and probably requires) flipped instruction (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm) WITHDRAWN

Moderators
JM

Jennifer Muzyka

Professor, Centre College

Speakers
CL

Chris Luker

Highland Local Schools


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LTT 101

9:30am

S5: High School Teaching as a Profession
A recent longitudinal study of the US public high school chemistry teaching workforce indicates that this population is becoming increasingly less experienced and exhibiting a high rate of turnover. One way to improve retention is to develop communities of practice centered on activities that improve teaching and learning and facilitate continuous growth. In this symposium, we aim to identify ways in which teachers can grow and build a long-term teaching career in the face of the multiple challenges they face. Presentations in this symposium will explore the pathways of teachers who have engaged in activities that have positively shaped their perceptions of remaining in the career long-term, and highlight models for professional growth that can be applied across a range of school and state settings.

Presider: Gregory Rushton, Kennesaw State University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P131: Getting out to stay in: PD is key (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P132: My professional journey (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P133: Lessons from an unlikely journey to teacher leadership (10:15 am to 10:35 am) WITHDRAWN
P134: Research collaboration leading to increased energy and sustainability in the classroom (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P135: Teachers as species: Survive, interact, adapt, and thrive (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
Panel (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
R

RUSHTON

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

Speakers
DH

Debbie Herrington

Professor of Chemistry, Grand Valley State University
DR

Doug Ragan

Hudsonville High School
EY

Ellen Yezierski

Miami University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK BLL 126

9:30am

S13: Research in Chemistry Education
This symposium provides a forum for chemical education research. A submitted presentation should briefly address (1) the motivation for the research and type of problem investigated and (2) the methodology chosen to both gather and interpret the data collected. The presentation should focus primarily on the findings and the interpretation of the data. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS DivCHED Committee on Chemistry Education Research. 

Presider: Jack Barbera, University of Northern Colorado

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P151: Novices' and experts' understanding of energetics and heat flow (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P152: Developing a learning progression on chemical synthesis (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P153: Exploring college and graduate students' reasoning about chemical reactions (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P154: Scratching the surface of chemistry: A progression for categorizing chemistry problems (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P155: Students' understanding of energy across atomic-molecular and macroscopic contexts (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P156: Development of a two-tiered multiple-choice diagnostic instrument for assessing general chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate science (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P157: Development and preliminary testing of a persistence instrument: Measuring outcome expectations (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P158: Evaluation of the use of representations in inquiry-based chemistry instruction (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
TP

Thomas Pentecost

Grand Valley State University

Speakers
JB

Jack Barbera

Associate Professor, University of Northern Colorado
The field of psychometrics dates back more than a century and is concerned with the theory and practice of psychological and educational measurement. Researchers in this field have established protocols to develop and evaluate a wide variety of assessment instruments, including multiple-choice concept inventories. With these protocols, chemists can make measurements of student knowledge and understanding with the same care and precision they... Read More →
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LTT 103

9:30am

S4: Graduate Student Research in Chemical Education Research
This symposium aims to serve as a forum in which graduate students may share their work in chemical education research (CER), as well as a venue to network with other members of the CER community. The symposium consists of a series of presentations, each lasting 20 minutes, including two to four minutes for discussion. This is a great opportunity for graduate students in CER to gain feedback and suggestions on how to enhance the quality of their projects from more experienced researchers in the field. It is also a chance for the CER community to learn about new research ideas being explored by CER graduate students.

Presider: Lianne Schroeder, University of Illinois at Chicago and John Balyut, Iowa State University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P124: STEM concept inventories: Analysis of what's out there (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P125: Describing learning progressions for the chemical reactions of nitrogen and nuclear processes (9:55 am to 10:15 am) WITHDRAWN
P126: Exploring students' understanding of energy to inform an evidence-based learning progression for energy (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P127: How do physical chemistry instructors design their curriculum? An embedded multiple-case study (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P128: Comparison of organic chemistry peer-led team learning in online and face-to-face environments: A pilot study (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P129: Exploration of students' views of the PBL environment (11:30 am to 11:50 am) WITHDRAWN
P130: High school students' use and development of atomic models that are based on understanding electrostatic interactions (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
avatar for Lianne Schroeder

Lianne Schroeder

University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
JB

John Baluyut

Iowa State University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HON 148 HON 148

9:30am

S17: Web-Based Resources for Chemical Education
This symposium seeks presentations on resources that can be obtained over the Internet, and ways they can be utilized for the teaching and learning of chemistry. We are seeking presentations that address perspectives of development and implementation of web based technologies, and their applications to classroom, hybrid and online learning environments. Topics such as the application of mobile devices, and how social networking and semantic web technologies are influencing chemical education are also encouraged. The objective of this symposium is to provide educators and developers opportunities to share resources and experiences. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Presider: Jonathan H. Gutow, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P159: Education projects of the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE) (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P160: Proteopedia - a scientific 'wiki' bridging the rift between 3D structure and function of biomacromolecules (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P161: New bite-sized chemistry teaching resources that use real 3D crystal structures (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P162: Crystallographic research journals as an educational resource (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P163: Development of an interactive online crystal structure database (11:10 am to 11:30 am) WITHDRAWN
P164: 3D printing of crystallographic models from STL files at open access databases (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P165: Educational initiatives in crystallography during the International Year of Crystallography 2014 (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
PANEL (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
RE

Robert E. Belford

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Speakers
JH

Jonathan H. Gutow

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
JH

John H. Penn

West Virginia University - Morgantown


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LTT 102

9:30am

W53: Learning Chemistry at the Molecular Level with Advanced Visualization and Simulation Techniques (Part 1)
The arguably biggest problem for student comprehension of chemistry is that molecular-level explanations depend on mental images rather than direct observation. In other words, teachers and students must resort to models in order to rationalize chemical phenomena. Unfortunately, the quality of models found in textbooks, animations, and online learning tools varies greatly. This workshop is about working with computer-based models that not only offer compelling three-dimensional visualization, but that are

1) fundamentally science-based (rather than ad hoc illustrations), and

2) explorable (rather than limited to singular messages).

From the viewpoint of students and teachers, the scientific basis for the models can be a complete black box―all that matters is that a lot of mathematics makes a model behave realistically. The fact that the models are explorable, however, is of direct interest as it allows for

guided inquiry learning in a most natural way. The workshop attendees will address a few topics from the general chemistry curriculum with state-of-the-art software for molecular modeling. The potential pitfalls of using models in those areas of chemistry will also be discussed. Hands-on workshop−please bring your own laptop (Windows or Mac OS X) if you can.

Moderators
JS

Jurgen Schnitker

Wavefunction Inc.

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 113

9:30am

W54: WebMO Hands-On Workshop
WebMO is a web-based interface to modern computational chemistry programs (Gamess, Gaussian, Molpro, Mopac, NWChem, PQS, PSI, Quantum Espresso, VASP, Q-Chem, Tinker). Using just a web-browser, users can draw 3-D structures, run calculations, and view results. WebMO is simple enough for novice users (reasonable defaults are provided, and result are presented graphically) but flexible enough for experts (full access to input and output files is provided, and job types can be customized).

Workshop topics will include:

Overview of WebMO features and capabilities
Drawing molecules using the WebMO Editor
Running various job types
Visualization of results using the WebMO Viewer
Importing and exporting structures and jobs
Customization WebMO job types
Installation and administration of WebMO

This is a hands-on workshop, so participants are encouraged to bring their own Windows, Mac, or Linux laptop or Apple iPad. In addition to workshop activities, the WebMO developers will be available for questions and individual consultation.

Moderators
WP

William Polik

Hope College

Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 114

9:30am

W74: Share Your Teaching Resource Online: Join the Open Access Community!
Do you have a teaching resource that you want to share online? Join the iCollaborative community! Bring your teaching resource (class activity, lab, quiz, video lesson or just an idea) to this session for feedback from peers and iCollaborative representatives then receive help submitting your resources for publication on the iCollaborative site. This workshop will have four parts: brief introduction to iCollaborative; review of the iCollaborative’s resources and peer feedback tools; peer-mentoring session for potential submissions; and overview of the submission process. The AAMC-sponsored Pre-health Collection within MedEdPortal’s iCollaborative (www.mededportal.org/icollaborative/pre-health) includes teaching resources geared for undergraduate courses populated by pre-health students. . The collection provides a searchable online repository of recommended instructional resources that target pre-health competencies like those on the revised MCAT exam. Many of the open access resources feature real-world contexts and active learning. Join the iCollaborative community of dedicated teachers/professionals and help shape this initiative!

Moderators
BB

Bruce Branan

Professor of Chemistry, Asbury University
NAAHP member | Flipped classrooms | homeschool curricula | secondary science teacher preparation
PK

patricia kreke

Mount St. Mary's

Speakers
SB

Stephanie Brouet

Saginaw Valley State University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 115

9:30am

W25: Energy in Chemistry: From the Macroscopic to the Particulate Levels
Energy is a cross-cutting concept in all science disciplines and can be used as a framework in chemistry to help students understand the properties and behavior of substances at multiple levels. This is the first session of a two-part workshop designed to analyze, discuss, and reflect on diverse instructional strategies that actively engage students in thinking about energy issues in chemistry at the macroscopic, particulate, and atomic levels, using multiple representations. We will also illustrate how to diagnose and formatively assess student understanding. In this first session of the workshop participants will actively engage in design and modeling activities that can help students deepen their conceptual understanding about energy, heat, and temperature in macroscopic systems, and kinetic and potential energy of particles in models of matter developed to explain physical changes.

This workshop has been developed by the American Chemical Society (ACS) High School Chemistry Professional Development Leadership Group.

Moderators
MG

Marta Gmurczyk

American Chemical Society

Speakers
JA

Julie Andrew

University of Colorado
SB

Shelley Belleau

Mapleton Expeditionary School of Art
BB

Bonnie Bloom

Hilliard Davidson High School
CB

Chad Bridle

Grandville High School
AP

Alice Putti

Science Teacher, Jenison High School
VA

Vicente A. Talanquer

University of Arizona
MT

Michael Tinnesand

Science Consultant


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 5:00pm
MAK D1209

9:30am

W58: Microwave Chemistry in Instructional Organic Laboratories
Limited Capacity seats available

Dedicated microwave reactors have become standard equipment in industrial labs, and microwave-assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) is increasingly well represented in the chemistry education literature. Thanks to the very short reaction times afforded by MAOS, organic lab curricula can be designed to incorporate inquiry-based approaches while still maintaining a broad synthetic repertoire.

In this workshop, participants will gain hands-on experience using dedicated microwave reactors to complete organic laboratory protocols, and can immediately determine the outcomes using a variety of analytical instruments (HPLC, FT-IR and/or NMR). The workshop will explore strategies for adapting conventional lab experiments to MAOS conditions. Curriculum design parameters and implementation factors will also be discussed.

Moderators
SM

Shaun Murphree

Allegheny College

Speakers
LE

Leah Eller

St. Mary's College of Maryland


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - 5:00pm
PAD 367

9:30am

W51: Jmol for Beginners (offered twice)
This workshop will focus on the use of Jmol (http://jmol.sourceforge.net) for the inclusion of active content on web pages that illustrate molecular structure in a dynamic way. No previous experience with Jmol is required, but some experience with HTML and web page creation will be useful. Discussion will include web sites already available for class use that can be used as is or as starting points. Participants will learn how to implement Jmol on web sites both in Java and in pure HTML5 and how to use the Jmol application to set up views and animations. Participants should bring their own laptop computer, if possible. Presented by the principal developer of Jmol.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hanson

St. Olaf College

Speakers
OR

Otis Rothenberger

Illinois State University


Monday August 4, 2014 9:30am - Wednesday August 6, 2014 12:30pm
HRY 117

2:00pm

W63: Non-Visual Methodologies for Teaching Multi-Sensory Chemistry Lab Activities (offered twice)
This workshop will feature methodologies and techniques for teaching chemistry lab activities in a hands-on way without the use of vision. The activities are valuable to all learners, though they are designed for students with visual impairments. Multi-channel sensory feedback through tactile, olfactory, and hearing in addition to vision will be discussed and featured in the various activities as part of this workshop. Concerns related to laboratory safety regarding students with visual impairments and other disabilities will also be addressed. A combination of high tech and low tech solutions for science access for all learners will be featured. This workshop will demonstrate aspects of the Science Activities for the Visually Impaired (SAVI) curriculum published by the Laurence Hall of Science from the 1970s, and how these techniques are valuable in today’s science curriculum. Further, commercially available technologies of audible and talking lab tools will also be presented.

Moderators
CS

Cary Supalo

Illinois State University

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 4:00pm
PAD 376

2:00pm

S25: How Do We Know What Students Know?
A major factor determining what someone can learn is what they already know. As such, it is important for educators to glean what information they can about what prior knowledge students have when they come into their classrooms. Additionally, much of educational research focuses on assessing and/or improving student learning outcomes. But what do we really know about what's happening inside of the minds of our students? No one knows exactly what someone else is thinking. Instead, we often interpret and infer what students know based on what they say or do. This symposium will provide a platform for researchers and educators to discuss underlying theories, methodologies, assessments, and analyses aimed at understanding how we think we know what students know. 

Presider: Thomas Bussey, University of Nevada Las Vegas

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P313: How we know what students know: Cognitive and learning science perspectives (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P314: Investigating the transfer of testing effects across different test formats in the general chemistry settings (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P315: Grounded theory as an analysis technique to capture student conceptions in chemistry (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P316: Probing students' prior knowledge of course topics (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P317: Items that make the test: Different types of assessment items, what they can tell us, and how they have evolved over time (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P318: Using evidence based on the response process to support the validity of inferences from educational measures (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P319: Using evidence-centered design to develop assessments for chemistry (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
TB

Thomas Bussey

University of California, San Diego

Speakers
SR

Stephanie Ryan

American Institutes for Research


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LOH 164

2:00pm

W67: Preparing High-Quality Proposals for NSF Division of Undergraduate Education Programs
The National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education (NSF's DUE) promotes excellence in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education for all students, and provides opportunities for faculty to obtain funding for projects that address current challenges and opportunities in undergraduate chemistry education. In this workshop, NSF DUE program officers will lead activities and discussions focused on important aspects of preparing high-quality proposals for projects designed to improve undergraduate chemistry education. The workshop will include an overview of DUE programs, as well as activities designed to assist participants in developing their skills for planning evidence-based and evidence-generating chemistry education projects; designing evaluation and dissemination plans; understanding the proposal review process; and considering the NSF/IES Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development.

Moderators
DR

Dawn Rickey

National Science Foundation

Speakers
NB

Nicole Bennett

Appalachian State University
DB

David Brown

National Science Foundation


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK D1117

2:00pm

S23: General Papers: Teacher Education and Decision-Making
Submissions to this session are encouraged from presenters that feel that their work does not fit into any of the predefined symposia. 

Presider: Corina Brown, University of Northern Colorado

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P303: Teachers' technology decisions for inclusive chemistry classrooms (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
P1045: In-class activities to help develop the skill of presenting higher level chemistry in a professionla environment (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P305: Teaching chemistry content & pedagogy with an innovative approach: The University of Indianapolis Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellowship Program (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P306: Attitude and knowledge of sustainability and education for sustainable development (ESD) among Nigerian chemistry student teachers and trainee teachers (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P307: Do chemistry teachers care to know what becomes of their ex-students? (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)

Moderators
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
ASH 2302

2:00pm

S34: Renewable Energy Laboratory Experiments for the Chemistry Curriculum
One of the current grand challenges is meeting the global energy need in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way. As a society, we will need to develop strategies that incorporate renewable energy in a sustainable fashion. This will require a combination of numerous things including new policy decisions, altering societal attitudes, and advancing technology and innovation. Therefore, teaching students to be environmentally literate, informed citizens has never been more important. In this session, participants are exposed to laboratory experiments centered on renewable energy concepts for different levels of chemistry courses. Lab experiments provide the perfect platform to introduce the ideas of current renewable energy technology and the idea of sustainability, while providing students with hands-on learning experiences and reinforcing topics currently being covered in the class. 

Presider: Jennifer Schuttlefield Christus, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P351: Juice from Juice: Outreach that integrates dye-sensitized solar cells and renewable energy education into high school science curricula (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P352: Instrumental analysis of biodiesel content in commercial diesel blends: An experiment for undergraduate analytical chemistry (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P353: Thermoelectric material synthesis and characterization in upper-level laboratory classes (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P354: SHArK: The Solar Hydrogen Activity research Kit (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P355: Solar Energy Activity Lab (SEAL): A collaborative project to help discover inexpensive, stable materials for solar photoelectrolysis (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P356: HARPOON: A research project to explore electrochemistry and catalysis in the context of solar energy conversion (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
JS

Jennifer Schuttlefield Christus

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1120

2:00pm

S22: Food Chemistry
This symposium will explore how educators use food to heighten student interest in chemistry.  Submissions should highlight either examples of novel course design using food chemistry, or else novel uses of food in the classroom to stimulate interest.  Submissions are welcome from all levels of chemical education.  This symposium is sponsored by cCWCS.

Presider: Keith Symcox, University of Tulsa

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P297: Food chemistry: Learning beyond classroom and using resources in the community (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P298: What all we need to know about fats? (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P299: Fundamentals of Cooking Chemistry: An online laboratory based course for physical science general education students (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P300: Using POGIL activities to teach non-science majors in a Chemistry of Food and Cooking course (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P301: Food, culture and chemistry in a freshman themed learning community (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P302: Incorporating food into a freshman seminar for chemistry majors and nonmajors (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P1037: Teaching food chemistry for a three-week intensive learning term (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
KS

Keith Symcox

University of Tulsa

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 102

2:00pm

S26: Interdisciplinary Chemistry Courses: Integrating Chemistry and ....
At the undergraduate level, an awareness of the importance of interdisciplinary connections has increased significantly in the last few years and a number of institutions have attempted to combine the traditional chemistry course or even whole programs with other subjects such as, but not limited to, biology, physics and mathematics. Integration of chemistry and another subject(s) can happen in either the laboratory environment, the lecture or both with a particular challenge lying in being able to mesh the separate courses seamlessly. The integrated courses generally aim to increase the interdisciplinary awareness of participating students, strengthening connections between the disciplines and giving a bigger picture awareness. Of course, this integration poses particular challenges such as not sacrificing the materials that would be obtained from taking the courses separately but the potential rewards are significant and this symposium is designed to discuss these.

Presider: Graeme Wyllie, Concordia College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P320: Powering the planet: Exploring renewable energy in an interdisciplinary first-year seminar (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P321: Teaching chemistry in the context of a cross-disciplinary research seminar (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P322: Geometry in chemistry: Learning sequences for incorporation into undergraduate chemistry courses (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P323: Integrating chemistry and mathematics education: Cross-disciplinary research projects are excellent seed events (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P324: Non-Newtonian Fluids: Math and chemistry meet (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P325: Pitching a bigger tent: Teaching introductory chemistry with an atmospheric focus facilitates the inclusion of global environmental issues (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
GW

Graeme Wyllie

Concordia College

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK A1165

2:00pm

S27: Liberal Arts Content and Pedagogy in the Chemistry Classroom: Making Connections Between Disciplines
The goal of this symposium is to discuss implementation of content and teaching approaches from the liberal arts into chemistry classes. Interdisciplinary connections in chemistry classes can help engage students and promote higher-order learning. Strategies for bringing material from humanities and social sciences into chemistry lectures and laboratories through themed courses or specific class activities will be presented. Teaching strategies adapted from non-science disciplines, such as discussion-based lecture, group work, and writing assignments, will be discussed. Speakers are encouraged to address challenges in incorporating liberal arts teaching strategies and the impact that these techniques have on student learning and engagement. Submissions from all levels of chemistry courses, including non-majors and high school courses, are encouraged. 

Presider: Kathryn D. Kloepper, Mercer University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P326: Debunking pseudoscience: Increasing scientific literacy in the classroom using critical thinking skills (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P327: Using liberal arts strategies to develop critical thinking in biochemistry courses (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P328: Reflection as a tool to identify misconceptions that hinder student learning (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P329: Shades of grey: Just because it can be done doesn't mean it always should be done (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P330: Bringing the Bard into instrumental analysis (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
Panel (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
KD

Kathryn D. Kloepper

Mercer University

Speakers
GL

Garland L. Crawford

Mercer University


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1112

2:00pm

W81: Workshop Using the ChemConnections Workbook (offered twice)
How does a nuclear reactor work? How is nylon formed? What is in my blood? This session will introduce activities from the new ChemConnections Activity Workbook that includes 59 classroom tested activities written in the context of societal and environmental issues. Derived from the ChemConnections modules, the collection of individual activities and laboratories allow real-world problems to be integrated into a broad range of teaching environments including lectures, recitations, and workshop based courses. Designed with attention to pedagogy and student learning styles, these activities introduce real-world applications utilizing a variety of methods including data analysis, laboratory, guided inquiry, and discovery. Ultimately these activities assist students in not only learning general chemistry, but also in understanding how chemistry relates to modern issues such as acid rain, nuclear energy, nutrition, and technology.

Moderators
SA

sharon anthony

Northland college

Speakers
KB

Kevin Braun

Beloit College
HM

Heather Mernitz

Alverno College


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK D1123

2:00pm

W94: Transferability Among Postsecondary Institutions: Past, Present, and Future
An interactive workshop will be held on student transfer and its related aspects. Through breakout and group discussions, participants will address challenges and concerns, as well as models that have been successfully used by institutions to aid student transfer. The workshop is designed for faculty and administrators of two- and four- year colleges.

The workshop will identify opportunities within ACS to raise awareness of student transfer among postsecondary academic institutions. The following questions will be discussed:

What challenges do students and institutions face with regard to student transfer?
What resources currently exist, both inside and outside of ACS, to facilitate student transfer?
What models for successful student transfer currently exist?
What unique role, if any, can/should ACS play in disseminating resources for successful student transfer?

Participants can expect to share their ideas, learn about effective practices at other institutions, and inform current ACS discussions with regard to facilitating student transfer.

Moderators
KB

Kishore Bagga

Drexel University College of Medicine

Speakers
JS

Joan Sabourin

American Chemical Society


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK D1129

2:00pm

S19: Authentic Research Experiences in the First and Second Year Curriculum: A spectrum-From Non-Science Major Courses to Organic Chemistry
Authentic research experiences allow students to practice being scientists; to be exposed to the way chemists approach problems, how knowledge is acquired, and the use of evidence to support that knowledge. The ability to embrace uncertainty, not knowing the “right” answer, is an integral aspect of this experience, but it is often a difficult process for freshmen and sophomores. This symposium invites discussion on the use of authentic research projects in the first and second year laboratory curriculum. Presentations should include important aspects of the successful incorporation of research projects into the curriculum as well as the challenges faced in the development of the program. The inclusion of tools used in the assessment of student gains related to the development of scientific inquiry skills is also encouraged.

Presider: Brenda Harmon, Oxford College of Emory University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P283: Uptake and impacts of silver nanoparticles on Brassica rapa: A research-based laboratory experience (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P284: Increased student engagement, motivation and achievement in a general education science course for first-year undergraduate non-science majors (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P285: Implementing the CASPiE course-based research experience at the United States Military Academy: Initial findings of critical thinking gains, experimental design abilities and affective responses (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P286: Impacts of research-based environmental projects in a second-year Analytical Chemistry course (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P287: Embedding a student-designed research project into an undergraduate laboratory classroom (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P288: Distributed Drug Discovery (D3): Education of undergraduate students in drug discovery research directed toward neglected diseases (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
NP

Nichole Powell

Oxford College of Emory University

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1100

2:00pm

W5: AP Chemistry Inquiry and Forensic Laboratory Manual
Here is an AP lab workshop that will satisfy virtually all of your desires; over forty-five inquiry and forensic based lab activities that parallel those now recommended (or required) by the College Board. The available manual contains detailed teacher notes, pictures of setups and sample data and calculations. All experiments have been correlated to a primary learning objective(s) and science practices as outlined in the College Board Curriculum Framework for AP Chemistry. An appendix now lists additional questions (with answers) teachers can ask students either during a pre-lab session or a post-lab analysis. Participants will have an opportunity to do several of the experiments contained within the lab manual.

Moderators
JB

Jesse Bernstein

Miami Country Day School

Speakers
JB

Jeffrey Bracken

Westerville North High School
PP

Paul Price

Trinity Valley School


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 205

2:00pm

S24: Guided, Guided Inquiry Labs
Learning how to teach guided inquiry labs can be difficult even for the most experienced teachers. For new teaching assistants it can be an impossible assignment. Without proper guidance the guided inquiry lab can result in a horrible experience for both students and TA.  The symposium will discuss methods for guiding (training) teaching assistants to run guided inquiry labs, problems associated with using teaching assistants to lead guided inquiry labs and examples of successful solutions.

Presider: Steven Brown, Universityy of Arizona

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P308: College teaching: A course in teaching for teaching assistants (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P309: Trainees as trainers: Principles and lessons of training meetings driven by teaching assistants (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P310: One strategy for monitoring and enhancing guided inquiry-based laboratory instruction (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P311: Teaching assistants in leadership roles: Pairing TAs for success (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P312: Why should students get all the demos? Using humor to improve staff meetings and other strategies (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)

Moderators
SB

Steven Brown

Teacher of teachers, University of Arizona
I teach people how to teach chemistry to non-chemists. I also teach labs to freshmen. I'd love to talk about these issues and anything else related to teaching chemistry.

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK A1117

2:00pm

S7: Integrating Green Chemistry Across the Curriculum: Upper Level Courses
This symposium will highlight the incorporation of green and sustainable chemistry across the curriculum.  The symposium will examine new classroom teaching modules/courses, learning methods and educational research, as well as laboratory experiments and experiences having their roots in the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry.  The symposium will focus on green chemistry materials designed to educate undergraduates at community colleges, four year colleges and graduate institutions.

Presider: Susan Sutheimer, Green Mountain College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P262: Green analytical chemistry: Teaching towards sustainable and responsible choices (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P263: Visible light photocatalysis – shining light on organic chemistry (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm) WITHDRAWN
P264: Green chemistry in a senior capstone course: Combining green chemistry, synthesis, spectroscopy, and research (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P265: Green chemistry experiments in capstone courses (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P266: Unorthodox teaching of chemistry: Using technical, historical, and motivational texts to teach green chemistry (no exams!) (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P267: Workshop style green chemistry course for science majors (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm) WITHDRAWN
P268: Undergraduate green chemistry course (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
LB

Loyd Bastin

Widener University

Speakers
SS

Susan Sutheimer

Green Mountain College


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LMH 114

2:00pm

S8: Issues in Teaching and Learning in the Chemistry Laboratory
The purpose of this symposium is to provide a forum to discuss diverse approaches for teaching in the chemistry laboratory. Issues that may be addressed in this symposium include: the role of inquiry in the chemistry laboratory, the unique aspects of the laboratory which target specific learning objectives, the potential link between learning science in laboratory and lecture environments, and the practical constraints to providing quality laboratory experiences in diverse settings. Presenters are encouraged to report preliminary data on research in progress. Symposium presenters and the audience are also encouraged to pose questions for discussion on issues addressed during the session. A panel discussion will follow the presentations. 

Presider: Barbara L. Gonzalez, California State University Fullerton

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P269: Progressive approach to improving undergraduate science writing through laboratory courses (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P270: Structured collaborative inquiry learning approach (SCILA) for STEM majors: A disruptive web-based teaching innovation for general chemistry laboratory courses at New Jersey City University (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P271: Letter writing: A pathway to better laboratory comprehension (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P272: Addressing plagiarism in the general chemistry labs (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P273: Investigating the effect of simplifying lab work on students' discussions of chemistry lab work (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P274: “What I did and what I learned": Improving student ability to communicate about their laboratory experiences with just one sentence (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
BL

Barbara L Gonzalez

California State University Fullerton

Speakers
KM

Kereen Monteyne

Northern Kentucky University


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 123

2:00pm

W14: cCWCS Miniworkshop: Food Chemistry (offered twice)
Exploring Chemistry through Food makes science fun and approachable to a student while providing an endless array of everyday examples to teach chemical concepts to Chemistry majors and non-majors alike. This mini-workshop will provide the participants with hands-on activities, demonstrations, discovery-based lessons, and small experiments that will focus on chemical transformations using food. Basic chemical concepts such as pH, color, nature of heat & energy will be explored in addition to cutting-edge molecular gastronomy techniques that will excite faculty and students alike. Participants will take home materials they can plug into various courses and labs.

Moderators
SM

Sunil Malapati

Clarke University

Speakers
SR

Subha Ranjan Das

Canegie Mellon University
EP

Elizabeth Pollock

Richard Stockton College of NJ


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 107

2:00pm

W34: Getting Students to make Evidence Based Claims: Development of Argument Driven Inquiry (ADI) and Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) Laboratory Materials
Inquiry and argumentation are complementary goals that make laboratory experiences more scientifically authentic and educative for students (Berland & Reiser, 2009; Jimenez-Aleixandre, 2008; Osborne, 2010; Walker & Sampson, 2013). This workshop focuses on preparing laboratory materials for two specific approaches to laboratory instruction: Argument Driven Inquiry (ADI) and the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH).

Participants are asked to bring an experiment that they want to adapt to ADI or SWH. Workshop leaders have extensive experience with each of the instructional models and will provide professional development on implementation of the two approaches, including investigation design, logistics of the lab report, and how to conduct argumentation sessions. Finally, participants will receive suggestions for convincing others to adopt one of these instructional models. While participation in the Principles of Running an ADI or SWH Laboratory workshop is not required, workshop leaders strongly recommend familiarity with at least one approach before registering for this workshop.

Speakers
MV

Mary van Opstal

Graduate Student, Loyola University Chicago
EP

Elizabeth Pulliam

Tallahassee Community College
JW

Joi Walker

Tallahassee Community College


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK D1221

2:00pm

W57: Microscale Chemistry from the United Kingdom
The session will show how qualitative and quantitative microscale techniques in practical chemistry, can tease out of the students a greater understanding of the particulate model of molecules and ions interacting with each other; how chemists interpret the visible with the invisible.

It will feature redox and precipitation reactions, volumetric and gravimetric analysis, electrolysis, a Hofmann voltameter, environmental, gas and organic chemistry.

Using equipment such as plastic folders, Petri dishes, crown bottle tops, plastic and Pasteur pipettes, syringes, very robust carbon electrodes and accurate microbalances, the participants will carry out most of the activities and asked to offer more possible applications of the techniques.

Positive comments point to the reduction of wasted lesson time allowing more discussion and questioning, better classroom control with less walking about, students able to work on their own, reducing working memory overload and improved safety. It also addresses green issues such as less waste.

Moderators
BW

Bob Worley

Chemistry Adviser, CLEAPSS (UK)
I taught 11-18 year old students for 20 years and now for the last 22 years I (although retired - hah) continue to work as the chemistry adviser for CLEAPSS, www.cleapss.org.uk, a UK organisation, to which all high, middle and primary schools in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and many parts of the world, subscribe. It provides support and advice on practical activities in science, D&T and art to teachers, technicians, Head Teachers, School... Read More →

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 377

2:00pm

W1: A cCWCS Miniworkshop on Computational Chemistry for Chemistry Educators (offered twice)
This workshop will explore various ways that computers can be used to enhance and expand the educational experience of students enrolled in the high school or undergraduate chemistry curriculum. Brief discussions and extensive hands-on laboratory exercises of web-based molecular modeling and visualization software will be presented. No previous expertise with computational chemistry is expected.

Moderators
SC

Shawn C. Sendlinger

North Carolina Central University

Speakers
EB

Elisabeth Bell-Loncella

University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown
CR

Clyde R. Metz

College of Charleston


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 116

2:00pm

W12: Card Games to Teach Ionic Compound Nomenclature
In this workshop, participants will play a multi-level card game designed to help introductory chemistry students learn how to read and write the names and formulas for common acids and ionic compounds. The instructional materials were developed by the workshop organizers for use in their high school and college introductory chemistry courses. After watching a short, 10-min video about the game, workshop participants will divide into groups of 3-4 to play the game. Participants will be asked to critique the card game for use in different educational settings. At the end of the workshop, each participant will receive a complimentary laminated game set. The game set includes the instructional video and the easily-modified document files for reprinting and classroom use.

Moderators
JC

Janet Coonce

Tennessee Tech University
I enjoy discussing ways to make topics in general, organic, and biochemistry more exciting, engaging, and relevant for both high school and undergraduate students.

Speakers
TM

Twannelle Majors

Tennessee Tech University


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 168

2:00pm

W80: The Fabulous World of Beaded Molecules: Constructing Arbitrary Fullerenes with Beads
Constructing a three-dimensional physical model for a complicated molecule is important for students to visualize the spatial arrangement of different parts in that molecule. We developed systematic strategy for making cage-like fullerene without any hole based on the spiral code of the corresponding fullerene and other exotic graphitic structures using the technique of mathematical beading.

In this workshop, we will give the participants hands-on experience on how to make beaded models for several important fullerenes such as C60 or C70 and give the correct interpretation based on the valence sphere model developed by Prof. Henry Bent. In the first project, we will make beaded model for the hypothetical molecule C20, which consists of twelve pentagons. Participants will learn the basic techniques of weaving for other fullerene compounds in about half hour. With this experience, we will move on to the next structure C60 or C70 in the next project.

Moderators
BJ

Bih-Yaw Jin

National Taiwan University

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 106

2:00pm

S29: Providing Supplemental Help to Struggling Students
Most campuses have a way for students to get supplemental tutoring for science classes.  These resources are an invaluable tool for helping students understand Chemistry concepts and often provide a place for focused learning.  Some students go in for a quick question and other should bring a sleeping bag.  Unfortunately, there aren’t many opportunities for those involved with science learning centers, tutoring, and supplemental instruction to come together and share best practices.  This symposium will showcase tutoring at various institutions including their best practices and struggles.

Presider: Heather Sklenicka, Rochester Community and Technical College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P331: Design and implementation of a General Chemistry support course (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P332: Supplementing General Chemistry via an interdisciplinary Chemistry/Algebra course (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P333: Success GTAs: What are they and why do we need them (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P334: Building a learning community in chemistry through peer support (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P335: Assessing a learning center: Ideas from RCTC's Comprehensive Learning Center (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)

Moderators
HS

Heather Sklenicka

Rochester Community and Technical College

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK A1151

2:00pm

S32: Fostering Innovations through Collaboration between College and Pre-College Chemistry Teachers
This full-day symposium will focus on the innovations that have emerged through partnerships between college chemistry departments and pre-service and in-service teachers. The morning session will focus on the innovative ways in which college chemistry departments have become involved in the preparation of pre-service teachers. The afternoon session will turn to focus on how in-service pre-college chemistry teachers are collaborating with college chemistry departments to introduce innovative approaches to teaching and learning into their classrooms. Programs of interest include state and federally funded professional development experiences, Advanced Placement institutes, and technology-based workshops. Presenters from both the pre-college and college chemistry communities are invited to submit proposals to this symposium.

Presider: Sarah Boesdorfer, University of Northern Iowa

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P345: Instrumentation delivery to high schools by Purdue University (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P346: Using MOOCs to enhance student learning in chemistry (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P347: Equipping chemistry teachers in high-poverty rural areas: An approach in the Mississippi Delta (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P348: Innovative school - University science education partnerships (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P349: I-IMPACT: The use of teacher leadership as a guiding principle to developing strong teacher candidates (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P350: Innovations in Science methods courses: Preparing STEM educators through collaborative teaching (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
SB

Sarah Boesdorfer

University of Northern Iowa

Speakers
MD

Michelle Dean

Kennesaw State University
TT

Terri Taylor

American Chemical Society
ACS Education Division programs, products and services.


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK A1161

2:00pm

W4: Advanced IONiC/VIPEr: Using and Sharing Inorganic Chemistry Education Resources
Looking for a lively community of inorganic chemists who share teaching ideas and materials, support one another in grant writing and professional development, and laugh a lot? Or maybe you’ve already been to an IONiC workshop (Interactive Online Network of Inorganic Chemists) and want some time to upload new learning objects to the VIPEr site. VIPEr (the Virtual Inorganic Pedagogical Electronic Resource) is a website (www.ionicviper.org) that provides a platform to share content and materials for teaching inorganic chemistry, while building the IONiC community. In this advanced workshop, participants will focus on (1) writing and uploading a learning object, (2) enhancing collaboration between instructors, and (3) fostering virtual interactions with students using technology. Participants will explore the VIPEr forums, where a global audience of inorganic chemists discuss burning issues in inorganic teaching and research.

Moderators
BR

Barbara Reisner

Professor, James Madison University

Speakers
HJ

Hilary J. Eppley

DePauw University
SS

Sheila Smith

U Michigan-Dearborn


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 115

2:00pm

S3: Engaging Students in Organic Chemistry: Laboratory Emphasis
This symposium includes presentations of a variety of methods for engaging students in organic chemistry. These could range from individual creative activities to year-long methods of teaching using new pedagogies and anything in between. 

Presider: Barbara Murray, University of Redlands

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P248: Extraction and analysis of oils from corn and peanuts (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P249: Using TUES-funded NMR instrumentation to enhance teaching laboratory (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P250: Stepwise approach to writing lab reports in the organic chemistry course sequence (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm) WITHDRAWN
P251: Implementing an inquiry-based multistep synthesis in an organic chemistry laboratory course (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P252: Collaboration and guided inquiry in the organic chemistry laboratory (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P253: Gamification of the organic synthesis project at Mercer University part I: Design and implementation (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P254: Gamification of the organic synthesis project at Mercer University part II: Assessment and perceptions (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
BM

Barbara Murray

Director of the Center for Science and Mathematics, University of Redlands
I have been teaching Organic Chemistry for 30 years. About 10 years ago I converted to POGIL and have continued doing group work because I think it is the best way for students to learn.

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LMH 176

2:00pm

W90: The POGIL Project Workshop: POGIL in High School Chemistry Courses
This session is designed for high school teachers with limited or no previous exposure to POGIL. With a focus on high school classrooms, participants will have the opportunity to engage in POGIL activities, observe facilitation strategies firsthand, learn about POGIL classroom implementation, and discuss common barriers to implementation. After attending this session, participants will be able to: (1) name essential elements of POGIL pedagogy and philosophy, (2) list student learning outcomes supported in a POGIL classroom, and (3) create plans to begin implementation of POGIL in their own classrooms.

Moderators
AZ

Amanda Zullo

Saranac Lake High School

Speakers

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 119

2:00pm

S35: Survivor Skills for 1st to 5th year Teachers
We have all heard teachers in their early years of teaching say things like, "This is too much for me." OR "Maybe I am in the wrong place or doing the wrong job." Perhaps this is even the 20 yr teacher some days. National research indicates that one in five novice teachers leave in the first three years and as many as half will leave by the fifth year. Why do they leave? Often they are frustrated, overwhelmed and feel like they have little to no support from their administration or colleagues. In this symposium, experienced teachers will share lesson plans, activities, teaching strategies, projects, classroom management techniques and more so that novice teachers do not have to "reinvent the wheel." There will also be packets and a prize drawing for all the 1 - 5 year teachers attending the symposium.

Presider: Laura Slocum, Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P357: Making choices: Being yourself in the classroom (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P358: ACS: The ultimate chemistry teacher resources (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P359: Surviving safety (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P360: It's not what you know, but who you know (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P361: Using Twitter to build your professional learning network (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
Panel

(4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
LS

Laura Slocum

Chemistry Instructor, Heathwood Hall Episcopal School
Working with and for other HS chemistry teachers -- I love to learn new things from other teachers that can help me be a better teacher.

Speakers
DR

Doug Ragan

Hudsonville High School


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK A1111

2:00pm

S21: Flipping the Classroom: Organic chemistry
The flipped classroom facilitates active engagement between students and teachers during class time, usually through the use of technology to present material to students before the concepts are discussed in class.  This innovative pedagogical method is used by educators ranging from elementary school through college.  There are many different technological tools used to implement this pedagogical method.  Some educators pre-record lectures of themselves presenting material, others use screen casts to convey information to students before attending class in order to facilitate more peer-to-peer learning, and some teachers use a flipped classroom approach that does not involve videos.  Ultimately, the shift in learning is focused on changing the classroom from passive to active.  The focus of our symposium will be about how teachers use the face-to-face class time gained by changing from a completely lecture based classroom.  This symposium is sponsored by the CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education. 

Presider: Jennifer Muzyka, Centre College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P289: Using flipped learning to engage students without sacrificing content (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P290: Flipping the organic chemistry classroom using the Explain Everything app (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P291: Flipped teaching in organic chemistry (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P292: Lessons of flipping an organic chemistry classroom (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P293: Transformation of the traditional organic chemistry lecture sequence into a hybrid of face to face peer learning and online lecture: Another flipping organic chemistry course (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P294: Flipping the large summer organic chemistry classroom (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P295: Year one of a flipped organic chemistry course (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm) WITHDRAWN
P296: “Flip and click" your way to increased student engagement and involvement (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
JM

Jennifer Muzyka

Professor, Centre College

Speakers
CL

Chris Luker

Highland Local Schools


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LTT 101

2:00pm

S30: Affective Dimensions in Chemistry Education: Focus on Educational Technology & Learning
The affective domain refers to feelings-based constructs such as attitudes, values, beliefs, opinions, interests, and motivation. As opposed to cognitive dimensions, the affective dimensions in chemistry education received less attention by researchers. Educational technology on the other hand has been very popular in many fields of education, while it is slowly emerging in chemistry education. A branch of educational technology deals with Learning Objects (LOs), in which framework bits of reusable information are gathered in conjunction with guiding pedagogical and instructional theories to deliver instructional materials over the Internet. LOs could be effectively used in chemistry education at college or above levels to foster learning chemistry while supporting students’ emotional based needs through self-guiding, fast feedback, and individualized learning systems. This symposium will host the research and theoretical papers that are related to the affective dimensions in chemistry education that is enriched by educational technology implementations, LOs in particular.

Presider: Jerry Suits, University of Northern Colorado, USA

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P336: Reflecting on dual-process theories in chemistry education (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
P337: Self-regulated learning and chemistry achievement: Integration of affective and cognitive factors (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P338: Teaching chemical equilibrium with technology (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P339: Advantaging chemistry education through chat slangs for improved learning of chemical symbols (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P340: Student impressions, attitudes, and perceived learning with two homework systems (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)

Moderators
MK

Murat Kahveci

Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University
Here is a little to share from Murat's world. Glad to be connected with you friends—thanks all for connecting and sharing.

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK BLL 126

2:00pm

W10: BeSocratic: A Formative Assessment System Designed to Recognize and Respond to Free-Form Student Input--CANCELLED
BeSocratic is a flexible web-based system that gives instructors the ability to elicit, capture, and respond to students free form responses to a wide range of questions and scenarios such as student-generated graphs, simple diagrams and gestures. While instructional technology can be an important component of any course, the limitations of the interface often limit the types of questions and interactions that can be offered. However, there is emerging evidence that having students generate graphs and representations by hand is an important step in learning.

This workshop will focus on the use of BeSocratic where participants will have the opportunity to explore BeSocratic’s unique features by creating activities using the system and designing specific feedback for the various types of questions. Participants will need to bring their laptop to use during this workshop and will be provided with access to program for personal use.

Moderators
SU

Sonia Underwood

Michigan State University

Speakers
SB

Sam Bryfczynski

Clemson University
MC

Melanie Cooper

Michigan State University


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 113

2:00pm

S13: Research in Chemistry Education
This symposium provides a forum for chemical education research. A submitted presentation should briefly address (1) the motivation for the research and type of problem investigated and (2) the methodology chosen to both gather and interpret the data collected. The presentation should focus primarily on the findings and the interpretation of the data. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS DivCHED Committee on Chemistry Education Research. 

Presider: David Wren, Wake Forest University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P275: How do college students draw Lewis structures? (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P276: Characterization of the research-practice gap in chemistry education and factors influencing it (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P277: Is chemistry education research truly reaching the masses? (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P278: Increasing the impact of STEM education projects (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P279: Seeking evidence of longitudinal impact from a general chemistry course reform (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P280: Investigating evidence based on test consequences in chemistry education research (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm) WITHDRAWN
P281: Use of constructivism – based teaching approach in improving students' manipulative skills in practical chemistry (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm) WITHDRAWN
P282: Students' expected and achieved goals for the undergraduate chemistry laboratory (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
TP

Thomas Pentecost

Grand Valley State University

Speakers
JB

Jack Barbera

Associate Professor, University of Northern Colorado
The field of psychometrics dates back more than a century and is concerned with the theory and practice of psychological and educational measurement. Researchers in this field have established protocols to develop and evaluate a wide variety of assessment instruments, including multiple-choice concept inventories. With these protocols, chemists can make measurements of student knowledge and understanding with the same care and precision they... Read More →
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LTT 103

2:00pm

S31: Exemplary Papers in Chemistry Education Research
This symposium will feature exemplary papers in chemistry education research by authors who have been invited by the DivCHED Chemical Education Research Subcommittee to present. The purpose of the symposium is to highlight high quality published research that demonstrates good research methodology, analysis and presentation on important questions in the field. Authors who have published such papers within the past 2 years will be invited to  present their research and discuss how it was accomplished.

Presider: Diane Bunce, Catholic University of America

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P341: Making predictions about chemical reactivity: Assumptions and heuristics (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P342: College students' attitudes toward chemistry, conceptual knowledge and achievement: Structural equation model analysis (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P343: Research-based design and development of a simulation of liquid–vapor equilibrium (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P344: Activity structures and the unfolding of problem-solving actions in high school chemistry classrooms (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm) WITHDRAWN
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)

Moderators
DB

Diane Bunce

Catholic University of America

Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 107

2:00pm

S4: Graduate Student Research in Chemical Education Research
This symposium aims to serve as a forum in which graduate students may share their work in chemical education research (CER), as well as a venue to network with other members of the CER community. The symposium consists of a series of presentations, each lasting 20 minutes, including two to four minutes for discussion. This is a great opportunity for graduate students in CER to gain feedback and suggestions on how to enhance the quality of their projects from more experienced researchers in the field. It is also a chance for the CER community to learn about new research ideas being explored by CER graduate students.

Presider: Lianne Schroeder, University of Illinois at Chicago and John Balyut, Iowa State University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P255: Concept connection: An investigation on the information obtained from concept maps (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P256: Path analysis of physical chemistry learning: Effects of previous achievement, knowledge network quality, and metacognition on achievement (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P257: Effect of sex, numerical ability and attitudes towards mathematics and chemistry on student achievement in mole concept chemistry (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P258: High school students' chemistry self-concept: The role of the teacher and classroom climate (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P259: Implementing an assistive reader for blind test takers of the ACS exam (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P260: Use of online computer programs to measure student success in high school chemistry (3:40 pm to 4:20 pm)
P261: Investigating students' understanding of electromagnetic radiation and its interaction with matter (4:00 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
avatar for Lianne Schroeder

Lianne Schroeder

University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
JB

John Baluyut

Iowa State University


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HON 148 HON 148

2:00pm

W51: Jmol for Beginners (offered twice)
This workshop will focus on the use of Jmol (http://jmol.sourceforge.net) for the inclusion of active content on web pages that illustrate molecular structure in a dynamic way. No previous experience with Jmol is required, but some experience with HTML and web page creation will be useful. Discussion will include web sites already available for class use that can be used as is or as starting points. Participants will learn how to implement Jmol on web sites both in Java and in pure HTML5 and how to use the Jmol application to set up views and animations. Participants should bring their own laptop computer, if possible. Presented by the principal developer of Jmol.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hanson

St. Olaf College

Speakers
OR

Otis Rothenberger

Illinois State University


Monday August 4, 2014 2:00pm - Wednesday August 6, 2014 5:00pm
HRY 117

6:00pm

S33: General Posters
All attendees who wish to present their work in the form of a poster should submit abstracts to this symposium. A poster provides a concise and visual description of the work that serves as a backdrop for interactions between the author and session attendees. Attendees rotate through posters, stopping to read and ask questions at their convenience while authors answer questions and provide clarifications and additional information. More information about posters can be found in the Poster Guidelines document on the submission site’s main page.  

Presider: Ellen Yezierski, Miami University

Related Papers

POSTERS (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P362: Improving chemistry content understanding and critical thinking through evidence-based inquiry learning (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P363: Problem sessions promote learning communities in introductory chemistry (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P364: Development of undergraduate research in China (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm) WITHDRAWN
P365: Quantitation of methanol in distilled spirits via bench-top NMR spectroscopy: A high school research project (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P366: Effects of POGIL with attendance held constant (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P367: Techniques, synthesis, and analysis in a one-semester organic chemistry laboratory course of a liberal arts college (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P368: Collaborative intercollegiate online course delivery: Cheminformatics OLCC (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P369: Investigating students' understanding of ionic solids in chemistry with the use of 2D and 3D representations (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm) WITHDRAWN
P370: Enhanced chemistry learning through instrument access and personalized secondary educator training (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P371: Design, development, and delivery of the Nevada GEAR UP STEM Summer Institute (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P372: Adaptation of instrumental analysis to contemporary realities: Narrowing the scope to enable research skill development (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P373: Spartan modeling of general chemistry experiments (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P374: Chemistry of food and cooking: A gen-ed science class (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P375: Assessing and improving STEM student retention (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P376: Assessing ALEKS as a diagnostic and preparation tool for general and organic chemistry (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm) WITHDRAWN
P377: Investigating the relationship between success in general chemistry and cognitive and non-cognitive measures at Gonzaga University (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P378: Chemical inventory for teaching and research (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P379: Interdisciplinary authentic research laboratory in biology/chemistry/statistics (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P380: Professional development of oral communication skills through the use of three-minute slides (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P381: Measuring students' mental storage of chemistry information: A novel approach (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P382: Chemical education study of testing method for student understanding in chemistry labs (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P383: Inquiry-driven learning to develop and improve a green UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P384: Do students retain knowledge when taking large scale multiple choice common exams? (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P385: Revised first-year curriculum with an inorganic chemistry course: Ten years later (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P386: How classroom environment affects student-centered learning (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P387: Shaking things up: Lessons from a lower division lab overhaul (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P388: MedEdPORTAL's iCollaborative: Open access web resources to help chemistry instructors address pre-health competencies (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P389: Examining criteria for effective first year chemistry student placement (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P390: Green Fuels Depot: Demonstrating sustainable energy conversion on a local level (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P391: PUNK: The Polymer Undergraduate Network of Knowledge (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P392: Math prerequisites and student success in general chemistry for non-majors (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P393: Using a number line to visualize K, Q, and LeChatelier's principle (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P394: Preparing PUI students for critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills applicable to graduate school (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P395: Predicting success in general chemistry: Different measures and why they work (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P396: Learning styles of first year STEM students taking general chemistry (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P397: Science Night to the rescue! Adventures in professor and peer-led tutoring (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P929: Online-hybrid GOB course: Outcomes and lessons from the University of Evansville (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P930: Student's perspective on producing general chemistry pre-laboratory videos at Millikin University (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)
P1046: Implementation of the fuzzy adviser system for the chemical industry (6:00 pm to 7:15 pm)

Moderators
EY

Ellen Yezierski

Miami University

Speakers
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University


Monday August 4, 2014 6:00pm - 7:15pm
KC
 
Tuesday, August 5
 

9:30am

W6: AP Chemistry: Guided Inquiry Labs Using Probeware
Use the POGIL approach to turn a traditional activity into a guided-inquiry laboratory experiment. With PASCO’s SPARKvue® data acquisition and analysis software, you will explore guided-inquiry labs based on the new Framework for AP Chemistry. Discover firsthand how your students can meet AP lab requirements while gaining a deeper understanding of the required content. The workshop will run for approximately 90 minutes. Two subsequent 90 minute workshops will run in one three hour block.

Moderators
TL

Thomas Loschiavo

PASCO scientific

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 11:00am
PAD 205

9:30am

W50: Introduction to Vernier Technology for Chemistry
If you’re new to data collection with Vernier, or would like a basic refresher, this workshop is for you. Join us for hands-on practice using LabQuest 2– a popular stand-alone data-collection device. You will also be able to view and analyze data collected on LabQuest 2 using Graphical Analysis for iPad, or on any device with a supported browser using Vernier Data Share. Rotate through stations to conduct a selection of experiments from our three lab books, Chemistry with Vernier, Advanced Chemistry with Vernier, and Investigating Chemistry through Inquiry using the pH Sensor, our redesigned Drop Counter, Temperature Probe, Gas Pressure Sensor, Conductivity Probe, and Colorimeter. By the end of this workshop, you’ll be a pro at data collection and analysis with Vernier. Appropriate for college and high school chemistry. This workshop will run for approximately 90 minutes.

Moderators
EN

Elaine Nam

Vernier Software & Technology

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 11:00am
PAD 206

9:30am

W100: Utilizing Individualized and Active Learning to Demonstrate Student Gains (offered twice)
This workshop will facilitate a collaborative development of strategies for integrating adaptive and active learning techniques in chemistry courses. Workshop participants will work together to discuss, present and analyze various techniques and tools that increase student preparation, student self-awareness, and student engagement including Learning Catalytics, an advanced, cloud-based learning analytics and assessment system developed by Eric Mazur, Brian Lukoff, and Gary King of Harvard University. Research shows that instant feedback and peer-to-peer engagement lead to improved student comprehension and this workshop will explore the most effective ways to determine which concepts require further exploration and how to group students accordingly for additional discussion and problem solving

Moderators
Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 117

9:30am

S41: GOB Chemistry – What Do We Include and How Do We Deliver?
Many health professions programs require one or two semesters of chemistry as a General, Organic, and Biochemistry (GOB) course. This course has a unique set of challenges for the chemical educator including time management, content expectations by programs, and unprepared students who may not see how chemistry applies to their major. Educators are invited to present on their development/management of course content, assessment of student learning, or evidence-based classroom instructional strategies. This session will conclude with a discussion where the audience and the presenters will identify successful trends in teaching the GOB course.

Presider: Laura Frost, Florida Gulf Coast University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P472: Examining factors that influence conceptual retention throughout a 2-semester GOB course: Part 1 (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P473: Examining factors that influence conceptual retention throughout a 2-semester GOB course: Part 2 (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P474: X-ray of the GOB chemistry course (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P475: What do nurses tell us they need to know? (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P476: Writing GOB texts to meet learning needs of students (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P477: Every picture tells a story: Retelling the GOB story to the millennial generation (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P478: Interactive digital presentation of chemistry courses using Prezi and Voice Thread an alternative to Powerpoint (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P479: One in-depth look of visual aids represented in general, organic, and biochemistry textbooks (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm) WITHDRAWN

Moderators
LF

Laura Frost

Florida Gulf Coast University

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LOH 164

9:30am

S15: Student-Centered Learning with a Focus on Improving Process Skills in the Classroom and Laboratory: Strategies for Structuring Student-Centered Learning and Organic Chemistry Implementation
The purpose of this symposium is to bring together practitioners of a variety of student-centered pedagogies (such as PBL, PLTL, POGIL, or TBL), from high school through university level. Emphasis will be placed on those approaches that require students to be actively engaged on a regular basis, with a focus on improving process skills such as communication, teamwork, critical thinking, or problem solving. Presentations that contain assessment of these student-centered approaches are especially welcome.

Presider: Suzanne Ruder, Virginia Commonwealth University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P419: Before you begin: Engaging students prior to implementation of student-centered pedagogies (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P420: Building effective learning teams (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P421: Student-centered instruction and the assessment of process skills: The evaluation of student work (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P422: Assessing process skills in a large POGIL classroom (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P423: Facilitating organic chemistry using POGIL and student responders (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P424: POGIL vs. lecture in an organic chemistry classroom: Does it make a difference in student performance? (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P425: Infusing technologies and pedagogy to enhance learning in the classroom and laboratory (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
Panel (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
GF

Gina Frey

Washington University in St. Louis

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 122

9:30am

S44: Interactive Technology in the Classroom: Innovation, Challenges, and Best Practices for Student Engagement and Learning
With the growing number of available interactive educational technology resources, chemistry educators are confronted with both new challenges and innovative opportunities when integrating these technologies into classroom practice. This symposium invites presentations on innovative in-class uses of interactive technologies by students, as well as implementation challenges and best practices for effective use. Interactive technologies on mobile devices and computers can include: student open-response tools; animations, simulations, and other interactive visualization tools; virtual open inquiry spaces; multi-touch interactive books; and others.   Presentations can focus on the use of interactive technologies to foster a more student centered classroom, enhance student engagement and learning, or provide formative assessment to students and instructors.  Research on technology use, discussion of implementation challenges in high school and university settings, and best practices for technology-specific facilitation are welcomed.  This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Presider: Brett McCollum, Mount Royal University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P492: Teaching with touch-screen textbooks (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P493: Do no harm: Evaluating the impact of the integration of iPads into chemistry classrooms (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P494: Active learning in organic chemistry: Cell phones as classroom response systems (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P495: Impact of technology infused classrooms on teacher behaviors and practices (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P496: Towards reforming the organic chemistry course using evidence-based interactive learning methods (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P497: Comparison of general chemistry students' use of open-source texts versus traditional paper texts (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P498: Evolution of the Chemistry Collaborative Learning Center (CCLC) at Arizona State University: Lessons learned after 6 years and 35,000 students (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P1042: Smart classroom on a budget…in your pocket  (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
JC

Julia Chamberlain

University of Colorado Boulder
Finishing my third year at the University of Colorado with the PhET project, I am passionate about interactive engagement and using simulations to help students learn chemistry. This fall, I will begin teaching at a 2-year community college in the Los Angeles area. Come by booth #10 at the expo to chat with me about PhET Sims and teaching chemistry!

Speakers
IL

Ingrid Laughman

General Chemistry Coordinator, Colorado State University
BM

Brett McCollum

Associate Professor, Mount Royal University
Dr. Brett McCollum is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Mount Royal University, a Nexen Scholar and Apple Distinguished Educator. His publications span a variety of fields including SoTL, interdisciplinary teaching in science and public policy, and the use of the radioactive positive muon as a probe of chemical reactivity.


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1100

9:30am

S38: Chemical Education Research: Project Design and Data Collection Techniques
During a typical 20-minute presentation, a speaker can spend just a moment or two describing the highlights of his/her data collection plan before moving on to the “good stuff,” the data and results. The purpose of this symposium is to provide time to elaborate on the best practices in project design and data collection techniques. After all, a really interesting project that contains an ill-conceived data collection plan will not yield meaningful results. Papers that discuss issues associated with participant recruitment, selection, and sample size determination; describe how to determine what data collection technique(s) to employ; explain the pros and cons of particular techniques; and/or elucidate how data collection plans connect with other components of a project (literature review, theoretical framework, analysis techniques, etc.) are particularly welcome. The focus of this symposium is on the pragmatic aspects of developing and implementing a data collection plan, rather than on specific research results. 

Presider: Amy Flanagan Johnson, Eastern Michigan University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P453: Designing a testing effect study with general chemistry test formats (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P454: One software package to create and evaluate assessment instruments for general chemistry (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P455: Meta analysis of the effectiveness of concept mapping for chemistry instruction (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P456: “Round and round we go": Lessons learned in the course of research in representational competence (10:35 am to 10:55 am) WITHDRAWN
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P457: “I don't like chemistry because…" How do students' definitions of chemistry influence their attitudes towards the discipline? (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P458: Challenges studying adult populations in chemistry education research (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
AF

Amy Flanagan Johnson

Eastern Michigan University

Speakers
OO

Oluwatobi Odeleye

South Dakota State University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1151

9:30am

S45: Student Assessment Practices in Chemistry Education
The measurement of student knowledge, through assessments, has appropriately gained increased attention among chemistry educators and researchers.  This symposium will explore issues related to assessment practices used in chemistry education.  The intent is that this symposium will showcase both a diverse range of student assessment techniques used and efforts that are in place to improve existing techniques.  Example topics for this symposium can include the introduction of novel assessment techniques or studies designed to establish the validity of student assessments. 

Presider: Scott Lewis, University of South Florida

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P499: Defining the domain through a historical analysis of ACS general chemistry exams (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P500: Assessment of student comprehension of solutions via drawings (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P501: Determining the extent Creative Exercises promote students' concepts linking in General Chemistry (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P502: Assessing students' process skills: Designing a rubric to provide feedback to students and faculty about problem solving skills (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P503: Teachers' use of assessment results in high school chemistry classrooms: The practice of data-driven inquiry (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P504: Using survival analysis to investigate how students' ideas about structure and property relationships evolve during the first two years of college chemistry courses (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
SL

Scott Lewis

University of South Florida

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1111

9:30am

S23: General Papers: Technology for Teaching
Submissions to this session are encouraged from presenters that feel that their work does not fit into any of the predefined symposia. 

Presider: Jerry Suits, University of Northern Colorado

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P434: Making the transition from traditional online homework to ALEKS in general chemistry (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P435: Decision time: Do we require commercial e-homework or not? (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P436: eExams: Secure electronic testing for general and organic chemistry courses (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P437: Using emerging/interactive technology in the general chemistry sequence to engage and enable student learning (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P438: Using lightboards to create immersive video lectures by 3D blending of instructor and virtual chemical imagery (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P439: Connect-based structured learning workshops: Does SLW participation improve exam performance? (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P440: Comparison of face-to-face and online PLTL in general chemistry (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
ASH 2302

9:30am

S39: Chemistry of Fermented Beverages
Fermented beverages are arguably the topic with the second greatest potential to attract student interest in chemistry. Beer and wine are being increasingly used as a focal point for chemistry education.  Brewing and wine making involve all subdisciplines of chemistry. They have played a key role in the history and development of chemistry. This symposium will feature work on the chemical/educational implications of beer and wine origins, history, production, flavor, packaging, testing, and stability as well as to related issues such as environmental impact, economic/legal aspects, and health issues. Submissions can apply to experiences in the classroom, teaching laboratory, internships/field experiences, or to academic research.

Presider: Roger Barth, West Chester University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P459: Chemistry of beer: An 8,000 student open course (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P460: Brewing Science - course design, options, and outcomes (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P461: Brewpub and brewery operations: Mixing science and business (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P462: Engaging non-majors in chemistry through brewing and POGIL (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P463: Beer as an introduction to chemistry (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P464: Profiling Texas vodka: Laboratory and field experiences (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P465: Alcohol in patent medicines: An examination of nostrums housed at the Henry Ford Museum (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P466: "Beer is good for you" as a message in academia (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
RB

Roger Barth

West Chester University

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B2110

9:30am

S36: Atoms First, Atoms Right: Right and Wrong Ways to Approach Atoms, Bonding and Molecules Within the Atoms First Framework
Recently, the Atoms First approach has gained popularity, resulting in a revamped syllabus for general chemistry. However, current implementations of the approach largely fail to reflect the mature state of knowledge on the topics of atoms, bonding, and molecules from the perspective of modern quantum chemistry. The primary emphasis of this symposium is on updating the fundamental science covered by the Atoms First approach to better reflect a rigorous understanding of the quantum chemical principles that describe atoms, molecules and bonding. The objective is to convey difficult concepts at a level appropriate for general chemistry students without sacrificing rigor, as traditional approaches such as Lewis structures, the octet rule, and VSEPR often do. While the principal emphasis of the symposium is on getting the fundamental science right, presentations that bring to light weaknesses in the existing curriculum or characterize students’ misconceptions are also appropriate.

Presider: David E. Woon, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P441: Successful approach to Atoms First at the high school level (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P442: Looking at life from both sides (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P443: One, two, many: Teaching MO theory of diatomics as a primary model of chemical bonding (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P444: Energetic order of atomic orbitals: Observed values versus textbook stories (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P445: Atoms first, but correctly: Consistent explanation of the periodic law (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P446: Nature of atomic lone pairs: A first step to understanding hypervalency (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P447: Insights into chemical bonding from general valence bond theory (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
Panel (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
TY

Tyler Y. Takeshita

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
TH

Thom H. Dunning Jr

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DE

David E. Woon

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 123

9:30am

S46: Teaching Inorganic and General Chemistry with VIPEr Learning Objects
The Virtual Inorganic Pedagogical Electronic Resource (VIPEr) provides a supportive community and a rich array of teaching resources for inorganic and general chemistry. The resources on VIPEr are available as discrete ‘Learning Objects,’ small pieces of curricular material adaptable to different classroom situations. VIPEr Learning Objects include in-class activities, laboratory experiments, literature discussions, problem set questions, 5-slides about (a mini-lecture format), and web resources. This symposium features examples of the development, adaptation, and implementation of VIPEr Learning Objects, and stories of the role of the VIPEr community in the professional development of faculty at various career stages.  

Presider: Joanne Stewart, Hope College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P505: MO's in sophomore inorganic inspired by a VIPEr learning object (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P506: Utilizing an in-class game to teach excited state processes in the inorganic classroom (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P507: Size counts: Building independent thinking skills through a student-centered investigation into alkali metal transport by 18-crown-6 (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P508: Downwardly mobile: Adapting VIPEr learning objects for a first-year chemistry course (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P509: Crowdsourcing assessment data: How my students taught me that a simple Lewis dot structure problem wasn't (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P510: What is taught in Inorganic Chemistry? A survey of the field (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
JS

Joanne Stewart

Hope College

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1117

9:30am

S37: Biochemistry Education: Discussions of the Lecture Learning Environment
This symposium will focus on teaching innovations and educational research related to the biochemistry lecture learning environment. The biochemistry classroom can provide students with the opportunity to grow and develop their understanding of the molecular life science concepts and practices. However, as many biochemistry educators can attest, this potential for student learning is not often fully realized. We invite those teaching lecture courses in all areas of biochemistry to share their work on topics such as, but not limited to, active learning, online education, and biochemical visualization. We encourage all symposium speakers to include some form of assessment such as results from surveys, exam questions, student interviews, or formal assessment instruments in their presentation.

Presider: Rodney Austin, Geneva College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P448: Identifying and refining threshold concepts for biochemistry (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P449: Improving biochemistry students' understanding of enzyme-substrate interactions (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P450: Assessment of the active learning biochemistry classroom (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P451: Impact of semester conversion on assessing the development of critical thinking skills using student group presentations in biochemistry (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P452: What do biochemistry students learn from some common external representations of protein translation? (11:10 am to 11:30 am)

Moderators
RA

Rodney Austin

Geneva College

Speakers
TB

Thomas Bussey

University of California, San Diego


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HON 148 HON 148

9:30am

S43: Instrumentation in the General Chemistry Laboratory
This symposium provides chemical educators utilizing advanced chemical instrumentation in the general chemical laboratory the opportunity to share their ideas and experiences. Presentations may include descriptions of instrumental additions to older labs, entirely new experiments centered around modern chemical instrumentation, or descriptions of a series of instrumental experiences that occur during the general chemistry course. 

Presider: Curtis Pulliam, Utica College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P487: Introducing spectroscopic analysis of unknowns in the first year laboratory courses (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P488: Introducing powder X-ray diffraction and diffuse-reflectance visible-light spectrometers to the general chemistry audience (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P489: Improving understanding of basic quantum mechanics in the general chemistry curriculum using benchtop NMR (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P490: Using a chemist's tools: Instrumentation in a non-majors course (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P491: Introducing NMR to a general chemistry audience: An Atoms First appropriate instrumental laboratory (11:10 am to 11:30 am)

Moderators
CP

Curtis Pulliam

Associate Professor and Chair, Utica College

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1161

9:30am

W65: Permanent Magnet NMR in the Undergraduate Curriculum
We present an overview of the importance of providing students hands-on experience with NMR and a hands-on workshop performing experiments with the instrumentation.

Moderators
BM

Bill Mohar

Thermo Fisher Scientific

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 244

9:30am

S7: Integrating Green Chemistry Across the Curriculum: The Path Forward
This symposium will highlight the incorporation of green and sustainable chemistry across the curriculum.  The symposium will examine new classroom teaching modules/courses, learning methods and educational research, as well as laboratory experiments and experiences having their roots in the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry.  The symposium will focus on green chemistry materials designed to educate undergraduates at community colleges, four year colleges and graduate institutions.

Presider: Loyd Bastin, Widener University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P413: Level of teachers' awareness and practice of green chemistry: Step towards greener tomorrow (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P414: EPA model program in sustainability: The institute for green and sustainable science summer program (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P415: Green Chemistry education: Not just for chemists anymore (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P416: ACS Green Chemistry Institute (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P417: Green Chemistry Commitment: A reflection on the first year of the program (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P418: Green chemistry education: Bridging gaps and navigating the road ahead (11:30 am – 11:50 am)
P1038: A progress report on a roadmap for Green Chemistry Education (11:50 am – 12:10 pm)
Panel (12:10 pm – 12:30 pm)

Moderators
LB

Loyd Bastin

Widener University

Speakers
SS

Susan Sutheimer

Green Mountain College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LMH 114

9:30am

W13: Caveman Chemistry (offered twice)
Non-science students often approach chemistry with reluctance and trepidation. This workshop will explore a strategy for engaging students through a series of 28 hands-on chemical projects. We begin in the Stone Age, making fire by friction, arrowheads, and honey wine. We make a ceramic crucible from clay, spin yarn from wool, and extract potash from wood ashes. We smelt bronze in our crucible and dye our yarn with indigo. In later projects we make paper from hay, soap from fat, mauve dye from aniline, and photographs from egg whites and salt. Along the way we learn a history of chemical technology from the Paleolithic campfire, to the crafts of antiquity, to the alchemy of the Middle Ages, to the chamber acid and soda factories of the Industrial Revolution, to the multi-national chemical giants of the twentieth century. The registration fee includes the book, Caveman Chemistry.

Moderators
KD

Kevin Dunn

Hampden-Sydney College

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 109

9:30am

W28: Experiential Chemistry: A Hands-On Laboratory-Based Course for Non-Majors
This workshop will be a hands-on introduction to Experiential Chemistry, a course designed specifically for non-science majors. The approach used in this course reverses the traditional pattern of science education where early mastery of factual material is required before the students are allowed to explore the interesting problems. Students are first presented with a series of exciting experiments and are allowed to experience the excitement of chemistry. Unlike other non-majors course, Experiential Chemistry is taught exclusively in the laboratory, with no lecture component. This workshop will give participants a chance to explore many of the experiences developed for the course and to discuss how the course is implemented. Copies of the course text will also be provided.

Moderators
MR

Marc Richard

Associate Professor of Chemistry, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

Speakers
EP

Elizabeth Pollock

Richard Stockton College of NJ


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 377

9:30am

S40: Electronic Laboratory Notebooks: The Paperless Laboratory?
Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) are becoming increasingly popular in laboratories representing all areas of science.  ELNs offer a number of potential advantages over traditional paper-bound notebooks, including better data sharing, data searching, and archiving capabilities.  While a recent review described 35 commercial ELNs currently on the market, some labs have successfully employed more generic software such as Google Docs, OneNote, or MediaWiki for ELN purposes. This symposium will allow presenters to share their experiences with ELNs in the teaching laboratory.

Presider: Mark Jensen, Concordia College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P467: Students' perceptions about the use of the electronic notebooks in a general chemistry laboratory (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P468: Electronic laboratory notebook use in the majors' laboratories at the University of Notre Dame (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P469: Experience and effects of migrating general chemistry I laboratory to the electronic lab notebook (10:15 am to 10:35 am) WITHDRAWN
P470: Electronic notebooks in the analytical teaching laboratory (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P471: What have I learned from a pilot project in ELN implementation? (11:10 am to 11:30 am)

Moderators
MJ

Mark Jensen

Concordia College

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1120

9:30am

W69: PSI4 Education: Open Source Computational Chemistry (offered twice)
PSI4 is an open-source suite of ab initio quantum chemistry programs ideal for both research and education. Pairing PSI4 with the WebMO graphical user interface, students can easily build molecules and set up computations to explore various chemical concepts such as polarity, molecular orbitals, and spectroscopy. In this workshop, we will present a variety of lab activities for beginner, intermediate, and advanced chemistry students using the PSI4/WebMO interface. Participants will not only receive hands-on experience using PSI4 and WebMO, but will also have time to develop their own lab activity in the presence of expert PSI4 software developers available for consultation. Each participant will receive a flash drive containing a lab manual with all activities presented at the workshop, the PSI4 software, and detailed information for setting up and using PSI4 and WebMO in a context similar to their home institution.


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 116

9:30am

W21: Constructing Stoichiometric Understanding Through LEGO®
A 2012 survey of children's toy usage in the UK showed that 92% of 6 to 12 year old children play with LEGO® building blocks. Although LEGO® building blocks can be assembled in myriad structures there are a limited number of building rules that govern construction. Consequently, the use of LEGO® building blocks as a manipulative presents a powerful knowledge structure that can be readily applied to enhance student learning of stoichiometry.

This presentation will outline five hands-on activities that have been developed to leverage student fluency with LEGO® bricks to improve student learning of stoichiometry. The rationale for the use of LEGO® building blocks, the learning theory that underpins their utility and the precedence for them in chemical education will also be addressed.

Moderators
KH

Kenneth Hoffman

Teacher, Rocky View Schools
Designing student learning opportunities through building toys | | Designing student-driven, cross-disciplinary digital learning environments | | Teaching social justice through chemistry

Speakers

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 106

9:30am

W31: From Teaching Props to Learning Tools: Exploring the Polar Nature of Water and Its Impact on Protein Structure and Protein Folding (offered twice)
Molecular concepts are challenging for many students, both because of the new vocabulary and the inability to interact with invisible entities. Accurate physical models allow students to experience these concepts. Participants will explore how water interacts with both polar and non-polar substances using magnetic water models. Next participants will discover how proteins fold in a watery environment, based on chemical properties of amino acids, using Mini-Toobers (foam-covered wires) and plastic sidechains. We will demonstrate 1) how the arrangement of amino acids in a protein influences the final three-dimensional protein structure, 2) how secondary structure stabilizes proteins, 3) how mutations can impact the protein shape and 4) what occurs at the molecular level when proteins denature. Additional models of proteins will be used to explore protein secondary structure, and Jmol tutorials that reinforce the concepts will be demonstrated. All materials are available online or through the MSOE Model Lending Library.

Moderators
MF

Margaret Franzen

Milwaukee School of Engineering

Speakers
CC

Colleen Conway

Mount Mary University
KD

Kimberly Dirlam-Schatz

University of Wisconsin – Fox Valley
HM

Heather Mernitz

Alverno College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1129

9:30am

W7: Atoms, Molecules and Ions, Oh My! Particulate Level Chemistry Inquiry Activities
This workshop will focus on strategies for incorporating inquiry instruction into your classes with a particular focus on particulate level models. Workshop participants will be introduced to some of the particulate level modeling activities that teachers who have completed the Target Inquiry (TI) program at Grand Valley State University have developed and tested with their students. Topics include physical and chemical change, equilibrium, and balancing equations. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to work through these activities, discuss important considerations for facilitating the activities, and learn strategies for incorporating more inquiry into their own classroom activities. Participants will receive a class set of materials to conduct the activities highlighted in the workshop and will be introduced the Target Inquiry web site where they can access student and teacher guides for over 40 TI teacher designed and tested inquiry-based chemistry activities.

Speakers
EY

Ellen Yezierski

Miami University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1135

9:30am

S42: Institutional Initiatives for Introductory Student Success
Introductory chemistry courses are an early part of most science curricula and sometimes serve as an unintentional barrier to student completion of STEM degrees. This symposium will explore institutional initiatives aimed at enhancing student success in introductory chemistry courses and related issues. Has your school tried something new, successfully or not? What concerns have driven change or resistance? Many schools have teaching centers for faculty or tutoring centers for students. Are these working on your campus, why or why not? How are best practices from individual classrooms transferred more broadly within a department or school? Freshman seminars or early research experiences may help focus and motivate students. Can these be reasonably implemented given limitations in personnel and resources? What aspects have you found to be most valuable for students? By sharing stories, we may be better prepared to launch programs that keep STEM accessible to all interested students.

Presider: Aimee Miller, Millersville University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P480: Getting to know you: Can a one-hour orientation week survey identify students who need academic assistance? (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P481: JumpStart C101: Helping introductory chemistry students hit the ground running (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P482: Implementing OER in a general chemistry course for science majors (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P483: Exam frequency in a high enrollment general chemistry course (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P484: Making the most of the quiz feature in your course management system: Beyond multiple guess (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P485: Math skills and student success in General Chemistry: Initial assessment and optional vs. required interventions (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P486: Assessment of Widener University's "Science Initiative for the Retention of Freshmen" (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P1035: First-Year Seminar: Preparing Undergraduate Students for a Liberal-Arts Education using Science and Art (12:10 pm – 12:30pm)

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LOH 174

9:30am

S2: cCWCS: Developing Faculty Communities to Transform Undergraduate Teaching and Learning
The Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops and Communities of Scholars program (cCWCS, NSF-TUES Type 3 Project #1022895) offers opportunities for college and university faculty to explore and refine new pedagogies and curriculum material. Topical workshops, which remain a central part of the project, are designed to provide a background of key areas of the chemical sciences along with pedagogical methods to introduce the topics into the undergraduate curriculum. The development of faculty communities through sponsorship of numerous miniworkshops, creation of topical web portals, and reunions, allows for the exchange of ideas, collaboration, and support for improving instruction in chemistry and related disciplines. This symposium will feature workshop alumni and instructors, and leaders of  topical communities. A particular emphasis is on how workshop participants have used workshop materials and follow-up activities to modify their classes, develop entirely new courses and establish new degree programs. For more information, please visit us at www.ccwcs.org.

Presider: David Collard, Georgia Institute of Technology

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P398: Project MUSE: Museum sabbatical experience for faculty teaching at the arts-science interface (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P399: Team-teaching art and chemistry in the honors curriculum (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P400: Viewing art from another angle: Utilizing cCWCS chemistry in art materials in courses for majors and non-majors (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P401: Application of principles learned at a forensic science workshop (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P402: Catching criminals with chemistry: A non-majors course in forensics (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P403: Forensic science and investigation comes to Miami University (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P404: Food and forensics: Topics for liberal arts courses in chemistry (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P405: Reinvigorating inorganic chemistry at Merrimack College with ideas from cCWCS workshops (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
DC

David Collard

Georgia Institute of Technology

Speakers
PH

Patricia Hill

Millersville University
LK

Lawrence Kaplan

Williams College
JS

Jerry Smith

Georgia State University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 102

9:30am

S3: Engaging Students in Organic Chemistry: Class and Lab Activities Emphasis
This symposium includes presentations of a variety of methods for engaging students in organic chemistry. These could range from individual creative activities to year-long methods of teaching using new pedagogies and anything in between. 

Presider: Barbara Murray, University of Redlands

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P406: Soft baits to window clings: An activity/demonstration to help students better understand polymers and plasticizers (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P407: Incorporation of Polymeric Materials to Enhance the Interest and Learning in the First Organic Chemistry Course (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P408: Survey of industrial organic chemists: Curricular needs of B.S. chemists (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P409: Organic chemistry drawing tool for students with visual impairments (10:35 am to 10:55 am) WITHDRAWN
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P410: Thumbs up, thumbs down: Predicting electrocyclic reaction stereochemistry (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P411: Acid-base student models in organic chemistry (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P412: Use of learning assistants in organic chemistry (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
BM

Barbara Murray

Director of the Center for Science and Mathematics, University of Redlands
I have been teaching Organic Chemistry for 30 years. About 10 years ago I converted to POGIL and have continued doing group work because I think it is the best way for students to learn.

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LMH 176

9:30am

W78: Teaching and Learning Inquiry in Chemistry Using Bonding (offered twice)
This workshop is designed to help participants develop an understanding of scientific inquiry in the high school chemistry classroom. Participants experience the structures that support the implementation of inquiry-based lessons in their chemistry classrooms by engaging in a lesson on chemical bonding. The inquiry strategies that will be illustrated in this workshop include aspects of the scientific process such as making simple observations, developing models, data collection, making evidence-based claims, and refining models and defending claims in a classroom discussion. The workshop will include opportunity to discuss common concerns about the implementation of inquiry in high school chemistry classrooms and strategies for overcoming common barriers.

Moderators
AG

Alisa Grimes

University of Colorado

Speakers
AC

Angela Cannava

CU Boulder
SS

Sara Severance

University of Colorado Boulder
HW

Heather Waldron

Englewood High School


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 376

9:30am

W84: The POGIL Project Workshop: Climate Change Concepts in General Chemistry
Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) activities have been used in a large number of general and introductory chemistry courses. While the activities themselves are designed to engage students in the learning process, sometimes the activity content does not engage the students. We have written a set of classroom POGIL activities that use climate change concepts to teach fundamental chemistry content. Another unique aspect of these activities is the incorporation of socioscientific models and questions, which are designed to encourage data-driven discussions of non-scientific content. Participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to work through a sample activity. Time will be spent highlighting the range of chemistry content covered in this set of activities and discussing how these activities might be incorporated into a general chemistry curriculum.

Moderators
DK

Daniel King

Drexel University

Speakers
GW

Gail Webster

Guilford College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 119

9:30am

W89: The POGIL Project Workshop: Introduction to POGIL in GOB/Allied Health or Prep Chem (CANCELLED)
This Workshop has been cancelled.

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a student-centered, team-based learning approach based on constructivism and the learning cycle. Teams of 3 or 4 build their understanding while working through content-based material and developing targeted process skills, such as teamwork, critical thinking, management, and problem solving. This workshop will provide an introduction to the principles and practice of POGIL , utilizing published activities for a GOB or prep-chem course as examples. Participants will experience a model POGIL classroom, analyze the structure of an activity, and discuss implementation strategies for beginning students. Attendance at this workshop will provide appropriate background for those interested in attending other POGIL Project workshop sessions.

Moderators
AM

Ashley Mahoney

Bethel University

Speakers
MG

Michael Garoutte

Professor of Chemistry, Missouri Southern State University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 168

9:30am

W98: Using Learning Catalytics to Facilitate Peer Instruction in a Flipped Classroom
Learning Catalytics is a "bring your own device" student engagement, assessment, and classroom intelligence system allowing instructors to assess students in real time, using open-ended tasks to probe student understanding. Instructors can engage students by creating open-ended questions that ask for numerical, algebraic, textual, or graphical responses - or just plain multiple choice.

Participants of this workshop will first experience Learning Catalytics from the student perspective, as the facilitators will demo the various question types. They will then be given time to create their own questions in the Learning Catalytics platform. Finally, participants will deliver the questions they wrote to the rest of the group allowing them to become familiar with the question delivery and data analytics. The goal of the workshop is to provide the necessary background and best practices for participants to use Learning Catalytics in their chemistry classroom.

Participants will need to have a laptop for this workshop.

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Stoltzfus

Matthew Stoltzfus

Senior Lecturer, The Ohio State University
Dr. Matthew W. Stoltzfus, or "Dr. Fus" to his students, is an accomplished chemistry Lecturer at The Ohio State University. He employs the "flipping the classroom" lecture approach in his general chemistry classroom and has done so for 3 years. | | He has been featured on ESPN and NPR mainly due to his iTunesU General Chemistry course, which has an enrollment of over 164,000 students. He is a co-author on the 13th Edition of "Chemistry... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 107

9:30am

S17: Web-Based Resources for Chemical Education
This symposium seeks presentations on resources that can be obtained over the Internet, and ways they can be utilized for the teaching and learning of chemistry. We are seeking presentations that address perspectives of development and implementation of web based technologies, and their applications to classroom, hybrid and online learning environments. Topics such as the application of mobile devices, and how social networking and semantic web technologies are influencing chemical education are also encouraged. The objective of this symposium is to provide educators and developers opportunities to share resources and experiences. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Presider: John H. Penn, West Virginia University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P426: Digital chemistry resources that teachers and students can rely on (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P427: Elements™ of Science Education: Joint PerkinElmer and University of Illinois - Springfield pilot on collaborative chemistry science (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P428: Chemical Education Xchange, ChemEd X (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P429: Re-envisioning chemistry textbooks with the ChemWiki (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P430: Scientific communication and the rise of video publications (11:10 am to 11:30 am) WITHDRAWN
P431: Mathematica as a tool for student engagement and publication (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P432: Web page template for embedding a virtual molecular model kit (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P433: One intelligent tutoring system for general organic chemistry (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
RE

Robert E. Belford

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Speakers
JH

Jonathan H. Gutow

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
JH

John H. Penn

West Virginia University - Morgantown


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LTT 102

9:30am

W55: Learning Chemistry at the Molecular Level with Advanced Visualization and Simulation Techniques (Part 2)
(Part 2) The arguably biggest problem for student comprehension of chemistry is that molecular-level explanations depend on mental images rather than direct observation. In other words, teachers and students must resort to models in order to rationalize chemical phenomena. Unfortunately, the quality of models found in textbooks, animations, and online learning tools varies greatly. This workshop is about working with computer-based models that not only offer compelling three-dimensional visualization, but that are
1) fundamentally science-based (rather than ad hoc illustrations), and
2) explorable (rather than limited to singular messages).
From the viewpoint of students and teachers, the scientific basis for the models can be a complete black box―all that matters is that a lot of mathematics makes a model behave realistically. The fact that the models are explorable, however, is of direct interest as it allows for
guided inquiry learning in a most natural way. Working with state-of-the-art software for molecular modeling, the attendees will address a few topics from the general chemistry curriculum (complementing the topics from the first workshop in the series). The workshop will conclude with a Top Ten list for using molecular models in the classroom. Hands-on workshop−please bring your own laptop (Windows or Mac OS X) if you can.

Moderators
MC

Michelle Corrigan

Wavefunction, Inc

Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1129

9:30am

W2: A Sophomore Organic Lab Research Experience: Distributed Drug Discovery (D3) for Neglected Diseases
This workshop will introduce essential elements of Distributed Drug Discovery. D3 labs enable student engagement in the fundamental research process of observation, hypothesis/prediction and experimentation utilizing computational, synthetic and biological testing lab modules. You will consider known drug leads for the possible treatment of Leishmaniasis, form hypotheses, and computationally select new analogs with potential drug activity. You will then carry out the synthetic steps shown to make these six new compounds using simple, robust, reproducible procedures, and inexpensive equipment. The polymer-bound products will be cleaved and analyzed off-site and the results from your six N-acylated unnatural amino acids will be pro­vided following the workshop. You will also conduct a biological assay to screen potential antibacterials made in a student lab at IUPUI.

Moderators
MO

Martin O'Donnell

Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Speakers
JD

Jacob Durrant

University of California - San Diego
WS

William Scott

research scientist, IUPUI
Linking chemical education to finding drugs for neglected diseases


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 5:00pm
PAD 207/367

9:30am

W79: The Automobile and the Periodic Table
The presenters teach a two-semester General Chemistry course to undergraduate engineering majors using the overarching theme of Chemistry and the Automobile. This workshop will explore automotive materials (morning) and automotive-related compounds (afternoon). Participant breakout groups will be asked to identify specific examples related to these themes and to suggest ways of integrating them into the chemistry curriculum. This cycle will be repeated three times in the morning and afternoon. The three morning cycles will focus on defining broad categories of automotive materials, the issue of lightweighting the automobile and possible case studies. The three afternoon cycles will focus on redox reactions that can be connected to the automobile and ways to categorize these reactions into manageable subsets, automotive-related metal compounds, and automotive-related nonmetal compounds. The presenters will provide feedback on how these topics are integrated into their courses and a list of useful resources.

Moderators
CD

Craig Donahue

University of Michigan-Dearborn

Speakers
CS

Codruta Savu

University of Michigan-Dearborn


Tuesday August 5, 2014 9:30am - 5:00pm
MAK D1117

11:00am

W30: Exploring Vernier Instrumentation in the Chemistry Laboratory
This workshop will highlight experiments for advanced high school, general, and organic chemistry courses. The workshop will feature our popular handheld data-collection solution, LabQuest 2. You will also be able to view and analyze data collected on LabQuest 2 using Graphical Analysis for iPad, or on any device with a supported browser using Vernier Data Share. Rotate through stations to explore instruments including our new Vernier UV-VIS Spectrophotometer, SpectroVis Plus VIS-NIR Spectrophotometer with fluorescence capabilities, Mini GC Plus Gas Chromatograph, Vernier Melt Station, and Chemical Polarimeter. Appropriate for college and high school chemistry. This workshop will run for approximately 90 minutes.

Moderators
MH

Melissa Hill

Vernier Software & Technology

Tuesday August 5, 2014 11:00am - 12:30pm
PAD 206

11:00am

W6: AP Chemistry: Guided Inquiry Labs Using Probeware
Use the POGIL approach to turn a traditional activity into a guided-inquiry laboratory experiment. With PASCO’s SPARKvue® data acquisition and analysis software, you will explore guided-inquiry labs based on the new Framework for AP Chemistry. Discover firsthand how your students can meet AP lab requirements while gaining a deeper understanding of the required content. The workshop will run for approximately 90 minutes. Two subsequent 90 minute workshops will run in one three hour block.

Moderators
TL

Thomas Loschiavo

PASCO scientific

Tuesday August 5, 2014 11:00am - 12:30pm
PAD 205

11:00am

W22: Designing a Distance Learning Chemistry Lab Curriculum Using Carolina Investigations
Help your online students learn the same critical science process skills as your classroom students. Carolina has transformed the hands-on labs you have used for years into distance learning labs that are reliable, safe, and affordable. Experience for yourself during this hands-on workshop how your students will easily learn the necessary lab skills and reinforce key concepts using Carolina Science Distance Learning kits. This workshop will last for one hour and fifteen minutes.

Moderators
MW

Mark W. Meszaros

Carolina Biological Supply Company

Tuesday August 5, 2014 11:00am - 12:30pm
PAD 157

2:00pm

W77: Successful Inquiry Labs for AP Chemistry
Bring inquiry to your classroom with new Carolina chemistry activities and see your classroom come alive. Carolina's new labs help students develop essential chemistry practices, understand Big Idea chemistry concepts, and learn chemistry through inquiry per the new AP Chemistry curriculum. Experience 3 different activities in this hands-on workshop. Handouts/free giveaways. This workshop will last for approximately one hour and 15 minutes.

Moderators
Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
PAD 157

2:00pm

W76: Student Directed Chemistry with Vernier
Do you need to add inquiry labs to your chemistry course? Vernier has done the work for you with our lab book, Investigating Chemistry through Inquiry. In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to conduct a chemistry inquiry investigation using sensors with our LabQuest 2. You will also be able to view and analyze data collected on LabQuest 2 using Graphical Analysis for iPad, or on any device with a supported browser using Vernier Data Share. Appropriate for college and high school chemistry. This workshop will run for approximately 90 minutes.

Moderators
avatar for Vernier

Vernier

Conference Planner, Vernier Software & Technology
aharr@vernier.com | Whether you’re looking for cutting-edge technology to enliven and support your labs in biology, chemistry, physics, or engineering there’s a Vernier solution appropriate for every grade level. And because we understand the needs of teachers – a high percentage of our staff are former teachers themselves – we offer unparalleled support for the life of your products.

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
PAD 206

2:00pm

W100: Utilizing Individualized and Active Learning to Demonstrate Student Gains (offered twice)
This workshop will facilitate a collaborative development of strategies for integrating adaptive and active learning techniques in chemistry courses. Workshop participants will work together to discuss, present and analyze various techniques and tools that increase student preparation, student self-awareness, and student engagement including Learning Catalytics, an advanced, cloud-based learning analytics and assessment system developed by Eric Mazur, Brian Lukoff, and Gary King of Harvard University. Research shows that instant feedback and peer-to-peer engagement lead to improved student comprehension and this workshop will explore the most effective ways to determine which concepts require further exploration and how to group students accordingly for additional discussion and problem solving

Moderators
Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 117

2:00pm

S41: GOB Chemistry – What Do We Include and How Do We Deliver?
Many health professions programs require one or two semesters of chemistry as a General, Organic, and Biochemistry (GOB) course. This course has a unique set of challenges for the chemical educator including time management, content expectations by programs, and unprepared students who may not see how chemistry applies to their major. Educators are invited to present on their development/management of course content, assessment of student learning, or evidence-based classroom instructional strategies. This session will conclude with a discussion where the audience and the presenters will identify successful trends in teaching the GOB course.

Presider: Laura Frost, Florida Gulf Coast University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P574: Prescription for increasing student interest in GOB chemistry (I) (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P575: Prescription for increasing student interest in GOB chemistry (II) (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P576: Motivating and engaging students in nonmajors courses (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P577: Course redesign based upon long range learning outcomes in GOB semester II (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P578: Motivating students by using a combination of case-based learning approach and video summaries: A pilot study (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P579: Leveraging learning through personalized instruction (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P580: Pop culture in GOB chemistry (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm) WITHDRAWN
P581: Revisions to GOB for better student engagement (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
LF

Laura Frost

Florida Gulf Coast University

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LOH 164

2:00pm

S15: Student-Centered Learning with a Focus on Improving Process Skills in the Classroom and Laboratory: Student-Centered Learning in Supplemental Programs and Life-skills Development
The purpose of this symposium is to bring together practitioners of a variety of student-centered pedagogies (such as PBL, PLTL, POGIL, or TBL), from high school through university level. Emphasis will be placed on those approaches that require students to be actively engaged on a regular basis, with a focus on improving process skills such as communication, teamwork, critical thinking, or problem solving. Presentations that contain assessment of these student-centered approaches are especially welcome.

Presider: W. Cary Kilner, University of New Hampshire

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P527: Self-guided learning modules: Deductive reasoning exercises to enhance conceptual understanding in General Chemistry (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P528: Solved problem analysis in a large chemistry classroom (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P529: Enhancing success in General Chemistry with problem-solving workshops (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P530: Chem-math project recitation program (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P531: Supplemental instruction in introductory biochemistry (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P532: Targeting content knowledge and scientific reasoning development in nonscience majors' chemistry (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P533: Teaching and assessing employability or student skills in the chemistry curriculum (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
Panel (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
GF

Gina Frey

Washington University in St. Louis

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 122

2:00pm

S49: Target Inquiry: Teacher Designed and Tested Inquiry Materials that Really Work
The Next Generation Science Standards expect teachers to develop an inquiry-based science program for students in which students learn science content while engaging in key science and engineering practices. Unfortunately, many teachers have little experience with inquiry instruction. Furthermore, science inquiry is a complex process incorporating many instructional methods making the development of high quality inquiry materials difficult.  In this symposium, teachers will present inquiry materials they developed and tested in their own classrooms as part of the Target Inquiry program. Each presentation will include an overview of the materials, important aspects of their successful classroom implementation, and student assessments. 

Presider: Ellen Yezierski, Miami University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P611: What the fizz? Stoichiometry you can taste (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P612: It's Electric! A guided inquiry electrochem lab (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P613: Red alert: A guided inquiry lab about reaction rates (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P614: My acid can beat up your acid: A guided inquiry activity on acid dissociation (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P615: Thinking small: An inquiry-based curriculum for particulate-level chemistry (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P616: Understanding the organization of the periodic table (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Speakers
EY

Ellen Yezierski

Miami University



Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1112

2:00pm

S44: Interactive Technology in the Classroom: Innovation, Challenges, and Best Practices for Student Engagement and Learning
With the growing number of available interactive educational technology resources, chemistry educators are confronted with both new challenges and innovative opportunities when integrating these technologies into classroom practice. This symposium invites presentations on innovative in-class uses of interactive technologies by students, as well as implementation challenges and best practices for effective use. Interactive technologies on mobile devices and computers can include: student open-response tools; animations, simulations, and other interactive visualization tools; virtual open inquiry spaces; multi-touch interactive books; and others.   Presentations can focus on the use of interactive technologies to foster a more student centered classroom, enhance student engagement and learning, or provide formative assessment to students and instructors.  Research on technology use, discussion of implementation challenges in high school and university settings, and best practices for technology-specific facilitation are welcomed.  This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Presider: Julia Chamberlain, University of Colorado Boulder

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P586: Placing interactive technology into the hands of students: Student perspectives on PhET simulations in the general chemistry curriculum (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P587: Students' use of interactive simulations in lecture: Instructor perspectives (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P588: Large-scale use of PhET Interactive Simulations in general chemistry (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P589: Teaching chemistry online and still hands on (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P590: Using interactive simulations to introduce molecular spectroscopy to upper-level inorganic students (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P591: Transforming the lecture into a virtual laboratory with Mathematica (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P592: Probeware + interactive simulations: An equation for enhancing students' understanding of chemical models and experiments (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P593: Investigating the mass-volume relationship from classic to collaborative cloud experiment (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
JC

Julia Chamberlain

University of Colorado Boulder
Finishing my third year at the University of Colorado with the PhET project, I am passionate about interactive engagement and using simulations to help students learn chemistry. This fall, I will begin teaching at a 2-year community college in the Los Angeles area. Come by booth #10 at the expo to chat with me about PhET Sims and teaching chemistry!

Speakers
IL

Ingrid Laughman

General Chemistry Coordinator, Colorado State University
BM

Brett McCollum

Associate Professor, Mount Royal University
Dr. Brett McCollum is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Mount Royal University, a Nexen Scholar and Apple Distinguished Educator. His publications span a variety of fields including SoTL, interdisciplinary teaching in science and public policy, and the use of the radioactive positive muon as a probe of chemical reactivity.


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1100

2:00pm

S45: Student Assessment Practices in Chemistry Education
The measurement of student knowledge, through assessments, has appropriately gained increased attention among chemistry educators and researchers.  This symposium will explore issues related to assessment practices used in chemistry education.  The intent is that this symposium will showcase both a diverse range of student assessment techniques used and efforts that are in place to improve existing techniques.  Example topics for this symposium can include the introduction of novel assessment techniques or studies designed to establish the validity of student assessments. 

Presider: Scott Lewis, University of South Florida

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P594: Automated analysis of students' constructed explanations in chemistry (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P595: Development of an assessment to examine understanding of chemical bonding and molecular structure of general chemistry students (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P596: Control charts of quantitative results (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P597: Undergraduate chemistry curricular enhancement through vertical integration and curricular mapping (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P598: Investigating student understanding of structure-property relationships and the role of intermolecular forces: Part 1 (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)

Moderators
SL

Scott Lewis

University of South Florida

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK A1111

2:00pm

S23: General Papers: Laboratory Activities

Moderators
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
ASH 2302

2:00pm

S47: Demonstrations that Develop Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry
Demonstrations are often used by teachers as a way to grab the attention of students and illustrate chemical phenomena.  The “wow, gee whiz” demonstration is effective as a hook to pique student interest, but it is less frequently used to help develop chemistry concepts.  This symposium will focus on demonstrations that can be implemented to facilitate student learning above and beyond engagement and application, placing particular emphasis on instructional strategies that help students develop rich conceptual understanding of familiar chemistry topics.  Presentation abstracts must include a description of the demonstration as well as the specific instructional techniques which promote conceptual understanding of chemistry.

Presider: Jamie Benigna, The Roeper School

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P599: Investigation of the origin of the Diet Coke and Mentos reaction (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P600: POE demonstrations (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P601: Dry ice into water: Where does the cloudy fog actually come from? Using a familiar experiment to teach a variety of chemistry concepts (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P602: Simple demonstration illustrating the law of conservation of mass (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P603: Catalysis of hydrogen peroxide decomposition (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P604: Boiling water made interesting − (really?) (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P605: Combining lecture demonstrations, computer simulations, clicker questions using a guided-inquiry approach to provide an opportunity for students to increase their conceptual understanding of topics in general chemistry (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P606: Shall we dance? (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
JB

Jamie Benigna

Chemistry Teacher, The Roeper School

Speakers

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK BLL 126

2:00pm

W82: The Future of the General, Organic, Biochemistry Course Sequence: An Ideas Lab Workshop for Responding to Upcoming MCAT Changes
Recently, the American Medical Association proposed changes to the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) based on recommendations from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and its own survey research in an effort to revise the MCAT to best assess the knowledge and skills necessary for success in medical school. Pertinent to chemical educators, these recommendations deemphasize a portion of the curricula of the traditional full-year general chemistry and full-year organic chemistry courses, adding more emphasis on biomolecules and biochemistry. The chemical education community has begun to discuss the changes via the July 2013 issue of the Journal of Chemical Education. However, the discussion in response to these changes is far from finished. The purpose of this workshop will be: (1) to discuss the changes to the MCAT that impact chemistry instruction, and (2) to generate ideas of how chemistry instructors and departments can best prepare premedical students.

Moderators
JR

Jeffrey R. Raker

University of South Florida

Speakers
LM

LaKeisha McClary

George Washington University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 106

2:00pm

S36: Atoms First, Atoms Right: Right and Wrong Ways to Approach Atoms, Bonding and Molecules Within the Atoms First Framework
Recently, the Atoms First approach has gained popularity, resulting in a revamped syllabus for general chemistry. However, current implementations of the approach largely fail to reflect the mature state of knowledge on the topics of atoms, bonding, and molecules from the perspective of modern quantum chemistry. The primary emphasis of this symposium is on updating the fundamental science covered by the Atoms First approach to better reflect a rigorous understanding of the quantum chemical principles that describe atoms, molecules and bonding. The objective is to convey difficult concepts at a level appropriate for general chemistry students without sacrificing rigor, as traditional approaches such as Lewis structures, the octet rule, and VSEPR often do. While the principal emphasis of the symposium is on getting the fundamental science right, presentations that bring to light weaknesses in the existing curriculum or characterize students’ misconceptions are also appropriate.

Presider: Tyler Y. Takeshita, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P557: 2D and 3D representations of atoms and molecules based on rigorous quantum chemistry: models suitable for general chemistry and advanced courses (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P558: NBO methods: Finding atoms and orbitals in molecules (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P559: Lewis-like structures: Consistent starting points for describing electronic structures across the periodic table (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P560: Construction of valence virtual orbitals (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P561: Uses for valence virtual orbitals (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P562: Insights into hypervalency from general valence bond theory: The recoupled pair bond model (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P563: Vertex or edge inversion? Understanding NH3, NF3, PH3 and PF3 inversion with recoupled pair bonding model (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
Panel (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
TY

Tyler Y. Takeshita

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
TH

Thom H. Dunning Jr

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DE

David E. Woon

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 123

2:00pm

S51: Undergraduate Research in Chemistry: Expanding Opportunities and Broadening Participation
Engaging undergraduate chemistry students in research is a valuable enterprise which utilizes some of the best practices of higher education. Chemical educators have demonstrated leadership in developing, implementing, and evaluating curricular and classroom approaches for increasing the number and diversity of student researchers. Presentations regarding individual or group projects in lecture or laboratory, redesigned courses which focus on a specific research topic, and/or the general undergraduate research process are welcome. Faculty who have incorporated research activities and/or projects into specific collegiate chemistry classes are invited to share their experiences. Expanding participation in research, while ambitious and potentially rewarding, also poses difficulties and challenges that differ from those accompanying traditional chemistry instruction. This symposium is an opportunity to communicate best practices and innovative ideas related to increasing the number and quality of undergraduate chemical researchers. 

Presider: Rebecca Jones, George Mason University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P624: Broadening participation in undergraduate research: Practical strategies for building sustainable programs (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P625: Supporting the academic success and developing the critical skills of community college students using undergraduate research and interdisciplinary learning communities (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P626: Creative world of synthesis: An introductory laboratory activity with a context (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P627: Multiple perspectives on formal training in support of undergraduate research participation (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P628: Research experiences in the undergraduate organic laboratory: Synthesis and studies of quinone methide precursors as acetylcholinesterase reactivators (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P629: Small ester synthesis by transesterification with analysis by Vernier mini GC and FTIR (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P630: Green Fuels Depot: Demonstrating sustainable energy conversion on a local level (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P631: Tandem Pauson-Khand microwave reaction (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Jones

Rebecca Jones

George Mason University

Speakers
TB

Tim Born

Grand Valley State University
TC

Timothy Chapp

Allegheny College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LMH 114

2:00pm

W26: Visualizing the Chemistry of Climate Change (www.vc3chem.com): A Hands-On Workshop Using Interactive, Electronic Learning Tools for Introductory University Chemistry
This workshop will explore new learning materials and pedagogical strategies to improve the link between core chemistry curricula and sustainability education, develop faculty expertise to place chemistry content in an interdisciplinary context, and use visualizations and case-based approaches to support an understanding of complex science. In 2014 the NSF-supported Visualizing the Chemistry of Climate Change (VC3Chem) project will release a set of free interactive learning tools to teach core chemistry concepts through the rich context of climate science. Participants in the workshop will investigate, test, and evaluate interactive web-based digital learning objects (DLOs) that connect climate literacy principles and core chemistry content. Specific topics include 1) isotopes and their relevance in determining historical temperature records, 2) IR absorption by greenhouse gases, 3) acid/base chemistry and impacts on changing ocean pH, and 4) thermochemistry and its role in combustion of fuels and the radiation balance of our planet.

Moderators
LM

Lallie McKenzie

Chem11, LLC

Speakers
MK

Mary Kirchoff

American Chemical Society
PM

Peter Mahaffy

Kings University College
BM

Brian Martin

Kings University College
MT

Marcy Towns

Purdue University
AV

Ashley Versprille

Purdue University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 115

2:00pm

S37: Biochemistry Education: Discussions of the Lecture Learning Environment
This symposium will focus on teaching innovations and educational research related to the biochemistry lecture learning environment. The biochemistry classroom can provide students with the opportunity to grow and develop their understanding of the molecular life science concepts and practices. However, as many biochemistry educators can attest, this potential for student learning is not often fully realized. We invite those teaching lecture courses in all areas of biochemistry to share their work on topics such as, but not limited to, active learning, online education, and biochemical visualization. We encourage all symposium speakers to include some form of assessment such as results from surveys, exam questions, student interviews, or formal assessment instruments in their presentation.

Presider: Rodney Austin, Geneva College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P564: "Metabolism Fun": Learning through gaming (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P565: Standing on the shoulders: Integrating pre-requisite course concepts into teaching biochemistry (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P566: Development of an online biochemistry lecture-only course for students entering health science fields (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P567: Art of teaching biochemistry: Mentoring ASERT post-doctoral fellows (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P568: Connecting basic concepts to experimental data: In-class journal clubs (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P569: Integrative presentations and explorations in the biochemistry context (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)

Moderators
RA

Rodney Austin

Geneva College

Speakers
TB

Thomas Bussey

University of California, San Diego


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HON 148 HON 148

2:00pm

W56: Learning to Learn Chemistry Camps
Pacific Crest has facilitated over 70 Learning to Learn Camps for over the last 20 years. Recently we have contextualized these camps - Calculus Learning to Learn Camp (SUNY Buffalo State University), SMART GRID Learning to Learn Institute (Stony Brook University), POGIL STEM Up Learning to Learn Camp Integrating and Algebra Learning to Learn Camp (Hinds CC), and Scholar's Institutes for the Honors College and Academic Success Institutes for Freshmen Academy (Grand Valley State University). These camps are designed to help students become successful learners and faculty learn to facilitate POGIL activities more effectively. Participants will receive sample materials used to run a Chemistry Learning to Learn Camp, a sample agenda, access to a facilitator's manual, principles of why the camp works, sample outcomes and guidelines for implementing this camp. Our mission is to increase success of STEM students and advance use of Process Education and POGIL practices.

Moderators
DA

Daniel Apple

Pacific Crest

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK D1135

2:00pm

S50: The Legacy of Systemic Change: Lessons for Chemistry Faculty
As part of the 1995 National Science Foundation Systematic Change Initiative in Chemistry, two groups developed a complementary set of modules focusing on real-world problems as a way to introduce important core concepts, show the links between chemistry and other disciplines, and create a flexible model for curriculum reform (http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=100783). Presenters in this Symposium will consider (1) how the topical modules and their use have changed over time,  (2) what active learning strategies have persisted, (3) what resources derived from these initiatives are available for use in classes, and (4) the impact of involvement on the subsequent professional work of participants.

Presider: George Lisensky, Beloit College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P617: "It's the content... no, it's the pedagogy... no, it's the people!" (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P618: “I can talk about them forever": Student responses to ChemConnections modules (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P619: Solids in the foundation: Blu-ray to lighting (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P620: Contextual and active learning in the introductory analytical course: The water module (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P621: Would you like fries with your reduced air pollution from automobiles? - Teaching renewable energy through Chemlinks/MC2 modules (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P622: ChemConnections Workbook (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P623: Making connections for our students and ourselves: Panel discussion (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)

Moderators
GL

George Lisensky

Beloit College

Speakers
JS

Joanne Stewart

Hope College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK A1117

2:00pm

W47: FTIR Spectroscopy and Permanent Magnet NMR in the Undergraduate Curriculum
We present an overview of the importance of providing students hands-on experience with FTIR spectrometers as well as permanent magnet NMR and a hands-on workshop performing experiments with the instrumentation .

Moderators
BM

Bill Mohar

Thermo Fisher Scientific

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 244

2:00pm

S48: Instrumentation in the Chemistry Laboratory Classroom: Lessons from Community Colleges
Incorporating technology and instrumentation into the chemistry laboratory classroom is now the norm at many colleges and universities as faculty seek ways to engage students in course material, improve critical thinking skills and prepare students for research experiences and the workforce.  However, with the current constraints in education, such as limited budgets, large and many course sections and fewer tenured/tenure track positions, the challenge to continue to acquire, incorporate and maintain instrumentation can be daunting.  As a result, faculty must seek innovative ways to include relevant technology and instrumentation in their courses.  During this symposium, presenters will describe and discuss methods to best deliver hands on use of and understanding of instrumentation in the laboratory classroom.   

Presider: Jennifer Batten, Grand Rapids Community College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P607: Transforming STEM education at small rural colleges: Incorporation of remote access spectroscopy and chromatography to create an authentic laboratory environment (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P608: Chemistry in the environmental science classroom: A model for K-12 and higher education collaboration (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P609: You can't do that! Instrumented chemistry labs online (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P610: Integration of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry into a two-year chemistry curriculum and independent research experiences (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)

Moderators
JB

Jennifer Batten

Grand Rapids Community College

Speakers
BL

Bernard Liburd

Grand Rapids Community College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B2110

2:00pm

W13: Caveman Chemistry (offered twice)
Non-science students often approach chemistry with reluctance and trepidation. This workshop will explore a strategy for engaging students through a series of 28 hands-on chemical projects. We begin in the Stone Age, making fire by friction, arrowheads, and honey wine. We make a ceramic crucible from clay, spin yarn from wool, and extract potash from wood ashes. We smelt bronze in our crucible and dye our yarn with indigo. In later projects we make paper from hay, soap from fat, mauve dye from aniline, and photographs from egg whites and salt. Along the way we learn a history of chemical technology from the Paleolithic campfire, to the crafts of antiquity, to the alchemy of the Middle Ages, to the chamber acid and soda factories of the Industrial Revolution, to the multi-national chemical giants of the twentieth century. The registration fee includes the book, Caveman Chemistry.

Moderators
KD

Kevin Dunn

Hampden-Sydney College

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 109

2:00pm

S40: Electronic Laboratory Notebooks: The Paperless Laboratory?
Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) are becoming increasingly popular in laboratories representing all areas of science.  ELNs offer a number of potential advantages over traditional paper-bound notebooks, including better data sharing, data searching, and archiving capabilities.  While a recent review described 35 commercial ELNs currently on the market, some labs have successfully employed more generic software such as Google Docs, OneNote, or MediaWiki for ELN purposes. This symposium will allow presenters to share their experiences with ELNs in the teaching laboratory.

Presider: Mark Jensen, Concordia College

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P570: Using an electronic notebook to foster collaboration (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P571: Electronic notebooks in the physical chemistry laboratory (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P572: Using Moodle wikis for laboratory notebooks and reports (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P573: Using Notability, a tablet application, as an alternative to electronic laboratory notebook software (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)

Moderators
MJ

Mark Jensen

Concordia College

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK B1120

2:00pm

W69: PSI4 Education: Open Source Computational Chemistry (offered twice)
PSI4 is an open-source suite of ab initio quantum chemistry programs ideal for both research and education. Pairing PSI4 with the WebMO graphical user interface, students can easily build molecules and set up computations to explore various chemical concepts such as polarity, molecular orbitals, and spectroscopy. In this workshop, we will present a variety of lab activities for beginner, intermediate, and advanced chemistry students using the PSI4/WebMO interface. Participants will not only receive hands-on experience using PSI4 and WebMO, but will also have time to develop their own lab activity in the presence of expert PSI4 software developers available for consultation. Each participant will receive a flash drive containing a lab manual with all activities presented at the workshop, the PSI4 software, and detailed information for setting up and using PSI4 and WebMO in a context similar to their home institution.


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
HRY 116

2:00pm

W62:Nitinol, the brainy wire
Come and learn about Nitinol, the interesting nickel-titanium alloy that's got memory, and about its several everyday life applications. Participants will do several hands-on activities that demonstrate the various properties of this alloy. A discussion of this and of other common alloys (samples will be shared) will be presented.

Moderators
AH

Al Hazari

University of Tennessee

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 107

2:00pm

W31: From Teaching Props to Learning Tools: Exploring the Polar Nature of Water and Its Impact on Protein Structure and Protein Folding (offered twice)
Molecular concepts are challenging for many students, both because of the new vocabulary and the inability to interact with invisible entities. Accurate physical models allow students to experience these concepts. Participants will explore how water interacts with both polar and non-polar substances using magnetic water models. Next participants will discover how proteins fold in a watery environment, based on chemical properties of amino acids, using Mini-Toobers (foam-covered wires) and plastic sidechains. We will demonstrate 1) how the arrangement of amino acids in a protein influences the final three-dimensional protein structure, 2) how secondary structure stabilizes proteins, 3) how mutations can impact the protein shape and 4) what occurs at the molecular level when proteins denature. Additional models of proteins will be used to explore protein secondary structure, and Jmol tutorials that reinforce the concepts will be demonstrated. All materials are available online or through the MSOE Model Lending Library.

Moderators
MF

Margaret Franzen

Milwaukee School of Engineering

Speakers
CC

Colleen Conway

Mount Mary University
KD

Kimberly Dirlam-Schatz

University of Wisconsin – Fox Valley
HM

Heather Mernitz

Alverno College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK D1129

2:00pm

S42: Institutional Initiatives for Introductory Student Success
Introductory chemistry courses are an early part of most science curricula and sometimes serve as an unintentional barrier to student completion of STEM degrees. This symposium will explore institutional initiatives aimed at enhancing student success in introductory chemistry courses and related issues. Has your school tried something new, successfully or not? What concerns have driven change or resistance? Many schools have teaching centers for faculty or tutoring centers for students. Are these working on your campus, why or why not? How are best practices from individual classrooms transferred more broadly within a department or school? Freshman seminars or early research experiences may help focus and motivate students. Can these be reasonably implemented given limitations in personnel and resources? What aspects have you found to be most valuable for students? By sharing stories, we may be better prepared to launch programs that keep STEM accessible to all interested students.

Presider: Aimee Miller, Millersville University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P582: Peer-supported programs to enhance learning in introductory chemistry courses (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P583: Improving student success through increased interaction with peer tutors via laboratory quizzes (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P584: Embedding learning theory instruction in a peer-learning program (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P585: Peer supplemental instruction for General Chemistry I (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
Panel (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LOH 174

2:00pm

S2: cCWCS: Developing Faculty Communities to Transform Undergraduate Teaching and Learning
The Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops and Communities of Scholars program (cCWCS, NSF-TUES Type 3 Project #1022895) offers opportunities for college and university faculty to explore and refine new pedagogies and curriculum material. Topical workshops, which remain a central part of the project, are designed to provide a background of key areas of the chemical sciences along with pedagogical methods to introduce the topics into the undergraduate curriculum. The development of faculty communities through sponsorship of numerous miniworkshops, creation of topical web portals, and reunions, allows for the exchange of ideas, collaboration, and support for improving instruction in chemistry and related disciplines. This symposium will feature workshop alumni and instructors, and leaders of  topical communities. A particular emphasis is on how workshop participants have used workshop materials and follow-up activities to modify their classes, develop entirely new courses and establish new degree programs. For more information, please visit us at www.ccwcs.org.

Presider: David Collard, Georgia Institute of Technology

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P511: cCWCS influences on programmatic and curriculum changes over the past 10 years at Newberry College (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P512: Materials, nanotechnology and biomimicry for renewable energy and ecological design (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P513: Medicinal chemistry: Course design, implementation, and student feedback (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P514: Developing green labs for general chemistry at large and small universities (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P515: Impact of my experiences at a cCWCS workshop on computational and theoretical chemistry. (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P516: Implementing guided-inquiry learning and technology into organic chemistry (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P517: Visual approach to NMR principles in undergraduate chemical education (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P518: Bridging the gap between life and physical sciences using nucleic acid chemistry and biotechnology (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
DC

David Collard

Georgia Institute of Technology

Speakers
PH

Patricia Hill

Millersville University
LK

Lawrence Kaplan

Williams College
JS

Jerry Smith

Georgia State University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAN 102

2:00pm

W72: Resources for Excellence: Using ACS Resources to Enhance Effectiveness at your Institiution
Two-year college participants work in groups to identify challenges at their institutions, and learn about and use ACS resources specifically for two-year colleges to solve them. Bring your business cards!

Moderators
CM

Candice McCloskey

Georgia Perimeter College

Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
MAK D1209
  • Audience Two Year
  • Room: MAK D1209
  • Fee: No fee

2:00pm

W78: Teaching and Learning Inquiry in Chemistry Using Bonding (offered twice)
This workshop is designed to help participants develop an understanding of scientific inquiry in the high school chemistry classroom. Participants experience the structures that support the implementation of inquiry-based lessons in their chemistry classrooms by engaging in a lesson on chemical bonding. The inquiry strategies that will be illustrated in this workshop include aspects of the scientific process such as making simple observations, developing models, data collection, making evidence-based claims, and refining models and defending claims in a classroom discussion. The workshop will include opportunity to discuss common concerns about the implementation of inquiry in high school chemistry classrooms and strategies for overcoming common barriers.

Moderators
AG

Alisa Grimes

University of Colorado

Speakers
AC

Angela Cannava

CU Boulder
SS

Sara Severance

University of Colorado Boulder
HW

Heather Waldron

Englewood High School


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 376

2:00pm

W85: The POGIL Project Workshop: Development and Implementation of Guided Inquiry Experiments for Physical Chemistry
The NSF-funded POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. Tested POGIL principles are being used to develop inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments that emphasize macroscopic and molecular models of chemical phenomena. The goal of the POGIL-PCL project is to make available a wide range of physical chemistry experiments with training materials and practitioner support so that instructors may assess their needs and resources and choose from a variety of turn-key experiments that best enhance their students' learning. This workshop will introduce the structure of a POGIL physical chemistry experiment through a classroom-tested, hands-on example, providing participants with both the POGIL-PCL experience from the student perspective and an illustration of what makes an effective guided inquiry experiment. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to discuss how to use the POGIL-PCL principles to write new experiments, how to convert existing physical chemistry experiments, and how to participate further in the POGIL-PCL project.

Moderators
RW

Rob Whitnell

Guilford College

Speakers
MP

Maria Pacheco

Associate Professor, Buffalo State College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 377

2:00pm

W86: The POGIL Project Workshop: Facilitating Upper Level POGIL Courses in Analytical Chemistry
Implementing POGIL in an upper level course such as analytical chemistry presents some unique challenges that differ from implementing POGIL in general and organic chemistry sequences. The goals of this workshop are to introduce faculty to the collection of POGIL materials available to teach analytical chemistry principles, as well as the facilitation and assessment strategies that are useful for a successful implementation of these materials. This workshop will a) introduce users who are already familiar with POGIL to newly developed classroom materials for analytical chemistry, b) help instructors develop implementation strategies that lead to effective use of these materials in an upper-level classroom and c) discuss assessment strategies an instructor could use to gauge the success of POGIL materials in upper-level courses. Interactive sessions where participants will work through selected POGIL analytical chemistry classroom materials and begin to develop a syllabus will be included.

Moderators
JL

Juliette Lantz

Drew University

Speakers
CF

Caryl Fish

Saint Vincent College


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
PAD 168

2:00pm

S21: Flipping the Classroom: Analytical, Biochemistry, Physical, and General Chemistry Lab
The flipped classroom facilitates active engagement between students and teachers during class time, usually through the use of technology to present material to students before the concepts are discussed in class.  This innovative pedagogical method is used by educators ranging from elementary school through college.  There are many different technological tools used to implement this pedagogical method.  Some educators pre-record lectures of themselves presenting material, others use screen casts to convey information to students before attending class in order to facilitate more peer-to-peer learning, and some teachers use a flipped classroom approach that does not involve videos.  Ultimately, the shift in learning is focused on changing the classroom from passive to active.  The focus of our symposium will be about how teachers use the face-to-face class time gained by changing from a completely lecture based classroom.  This symposium is sponsored by the CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education. 

Presider: Chris Luker, Highland Local Schools

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P541: Flipping a large lecture of GOB chemistry (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P542: Using flipped teaching for a summer introductory biochemistry course (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P543: Teaching physical chemistry with Team-Based Learning (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P544: On-line lectures: a strategy to liberate class time for active learning (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P545: Flipping the physical chemistry lecture course (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P546: Flipping the analytical and general chemistry classroom (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P547: Flipping the general chemistry lab program (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P548: Flipping the general chemistry lab (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
JM

Jennifer Muzyka

Professor, Centre College

Speakers
CL

Chris Luker

Highland Local Schools


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LTT 101

2:00pm

S13: Research in Chemistry Education
This symposium provides a forum for chemical education research. A submitted presentation should briefly address (1) the motivation for the research and type of problem investigated and (2) the methodology chosen to both gather and interpret the data collected. The presentation should focus primarily on the findings and the interpretation of the data. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS DivCHED Committee on Chemistry Education Research. 

Presider: Thomas Pentecost, Grand Valley State University

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P519: Undergraduate students' goals for chemistry laboratory experiments (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P520: Comparative study of the effect of cooperative prelab and postlab group discussions in general chemistry laboratories: Results from University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and University of Jyvaskyla in Finland (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P521: Thinking for life: Developing critical thinkers using the Science Writing Heuristic approach (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P522: Investigating students' conceptual boundaries of scale (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P523: Clickers work (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P524: Daily testing in large introductory chemistry courses: The effect on student achievement (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P525: Sorting formative assessment practices by type (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm)
P526: Points or no points? The impact of point incentives for online homework on test performance in general chemistry (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
TP

Thomas Pentecost

Grand Valley State University

Speakers
JB

Jack Barbera

Associate Professor, University of Northern Colorado
The field of psychometrics dates back more than a century and is concerned with the theory and practice of psychological and educational measurement. Researchers in this field have established protocols to develop and evaluate a wide variety of assessment instruments, including multiple-choice concept inventories. With these protocols, chemists can make measurements of student knowledge and understanding with the same care and precision they... Read More →
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LTT 103

2:00pm

S17: Web-Based Resources for Chemical Education
This symposium seeks presentations on resources that can be obtained over the Internet, and ways they can be utilized for the teaching and learning of chemistry. We are seeking presentations that address perspectives of development and implementation of web based technologies, and their applications to classroom, hybrid and online learning environments. Topics such as the application of mobile devices, and how social networking and semantic web technologies are influencing chemical education are also encouraged. The objective of this symposium is to provide educators and developers opportunities to share resources and experiences. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Presider: Robert E. Belford, University of Arkansas Little Rock

Related Papers

Introduction (2:00 pm to 2:05 pm)
P534: Anyone can do it...the democratization of the distribution of educational tools (2:05 pm to 2:25 pm)
P535: Challenges in the creation of an introductory chemistry e-text for non-science majors (2:25 pm to 2:45 pm)
P536: What can students learn from virtual labs? (2:45 pm to 3:05 pm)
P537: Contextualized virtual lab-based activities for chemistry education in secondary school: Analyzing an activity from action logs (3:05 pm to 3:25 pm)
Break (3:25 pm to 3:40 pm)
P538: More than just review: Instructor created chemistry problem-solving videos (3:40 pm to 4:00 pm)
P539: ChemVisual Data: an open web platform to allow students discover chemical trends (4:00 pm to 4:20 pm)
P540: PUNK – the Polymer Undergraduate Network of Knowledge (4:20 pm to 4:40 pm) WITHDRAWN
P1036: Kitchen chemistry comes of age (4:40 pm to 5:00 pm)

Moderators
RE

Robert E. Belford

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Speakers
JH

Jonathan H. Gutow

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
JH

John H. Penn

West Virginia University - Morgantown


Tuesday August 5, 2014 2:00pm - 5:00pm
LTT 102

3:30pm

W43: Inquiry Based AP Chemistry Experiments with Vernier
If you teach AP Chemistry, you won’t want to miss this workshop. In this hands-on session, you will gain practice in conducting inquiry-based chemistry investigations using sensors and instruments with our LabQuest 2 - our popular stand-alone data-collection device. The workshop will feature experiments that correlate with the new lab guidelines for AP Chemistry, including Beer’s Law, kinetics, and acid-base titrations. This workshop will fun for approximately 90 minutes.

Moderators
avatar for Vernier

Vernier

Conference Planner, Vernier Software & Technology
aharr@vernier.com | Whether you’re looking for cutting-edge technology to enliven and support your labs in biology, chemistry, physics, or engineering there’s a Vernier solution appropriate for every grade level. And because we understand the needs of teachers – a high percentage of our staff are former teachers themselves – we offer unparalleled support for the life of your products.

Tuesday August 5, 2014 3:30pm - 5:00pm
PAD 206

5:15pm

S33: General Posters
All attendees who wish to present their work in the form of a poster should submit abstracts to this symposium. A poster provides a concise and visual description of the work that serves as a backdrop for interactions between the author and session attendees. Attendees rotate through posters, stopping to read and ask questions at their convenience while authors answer questions and provide clarifications and additional information. More information about posters can be found in the Poster Guidelines document on the submission site’s main page.  

Presider: Ellen Yezierski, Miami University

Related Papers

POSTERS (5:15 to 6:30)
P632: Disseminating your programs in chemical education: The Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops and Communities of Scholars program (cCWCS) toolbox (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P633: Engaging first year undergraduates in research: The Coffee Project (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P634: Exploring the roles of energy and entropy in aqueous solubility: An activity-based approach (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P635: Revising "Safety in Academic Chemistry Laboratories" (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P636: Algorithmic and conceptual questions and their ratios on teacher created chemistry exams (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P637: Using Twitter to engage students in a general chemistry course (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P638: Using eye-tracking studies to evaluate student responses to multiple-choice items (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P639: Construction of a photometer as an instructional tool for electronics and instrumentation (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P640: Faculty perceptions of the factors influencing success in STEM fields (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P641: Pedagogical course to prepare graduate students for teaching (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P642: "I've seen this before;" The role of recognition in undergraduate-level organic chemistry problem solving (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P643: Conducting scientific research with deaf and hard-of-hearing undergrads (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P644: Creating and delivering a highly interactive on-line version of "The Forensic Chemistry of CSI" (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P645: Incorporating authentic research in an optional component of the second semester organic laboratory course (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P646: Guided inquiry sessions to supplement a large lecture course: Aiding and retaining struggling students (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P647: General chemistry program assessment: The role of online homework (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P648: Using models and tactile tools to teach introductory chemistry to visually impaired students (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P649: Implementing "Modeling Instruction" with fidelity and the difficulties chemistry teachers face in their classrooms: A case study (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm) WITHDRAWN
P650: Project iPad: Breaking teaching boundaries in organic chemistry (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P651: Online assessment tools for organic chemistry (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P652: Immediate answer-until-correct feedback in chemistry testing (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P653: Investigating the impact of project-based chemistry lab activities on student motivation and persistence (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P654: Recycling plastics: A POGIL activity for introductory chemistry laboratory (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P655: Investigating the relationship between study resource chosen and student achievement in general chemistry (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P656: Let us assume a spherical horse: Turning physical chemistry into a critical thinking class (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P657: Outreach that breaks down barriers (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P658: Shared best practices and products of adaptable design within the FOCUSSS teacher professional learning community (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P659: Organic lab separations (extraction, recrystallization and TLC): A sequential, integrated approach (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P660: Thematic use of ribavirin as an example to illustrate NMR principles and techniques (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P661: Mechanistic organization of introductory organic chemistry material for a biological emphasis course (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P662: Study patterns in general chemistry I (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P663: Radial chromatography: An alternative to columns in the undergraduate organic lab (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P664: Summer science camp for elementary students: What did they learn and what did we learn? (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P665: Undergraduate student exploration of parameters affecting substitution, elimination, and solvolysis reactions (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P666: Organic chemistry II research module: Synthesis of thiophene-arabinoside derivatives to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85C (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P667: Synthesis of air-stable imidazolium hydrogen carbonates for use as precatalysts in an undergraduate laboratory (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P668: Creating a periodic table with chemistry education research in mind (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)
P926: Teaching analytical techniques to high school students via hands-on research projects (5:15 pm to 6:30 pm)

Moderators
EY

Ellen Yezierski

Miami University

Speakers
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University


Tuesday August 5, 2014 5:15pm - 6:30pm
LIB
 
Wednesday, August 6
 

9:30am

W46: Interactive Experience with Microwave Technology in the Teaching Lab (offered twice)
Microwave technology has become a common tool for chemical synthesis and many academic institutions are incorporating microwave-assisted experiments into their teaching and research labs. Early introduction to innovative instrumentation, such as microwave reactors, teaches students to embrace ideas on the cutting edge of chemistry, better preparing them for technologies they will encounter in their careers.

This workshop will begin with a review of microwave theory, provide a pedagogical comparison of both single and multi-mode technologies available for the teaching lab, and highlight several examples of experiments that have been adapted for microwave technology with an emphasis on green chemistry principles. Participants will then run a reaction in both microwave technologies to gain a hands-on understanding of how microwave-assisted chemistry can fit into any teaching lab. This workshop will be 90 minutes long.

Moderators
MB

Marsha Baar

Muhlenberg College

Speakers
HB

Heather Baker

Sales | Market Coordinator, CEM Corporation
MJ

Michael J. Karney

CEM Corporation


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 11:00am
PAD 206

9:30am

W75: Spectroscopy for your Computer and Tablet
New from PASCO, a wireless spectrometer and fluorometer that allows you to easily connect to a computer or a tablet. The PASCO Spectrometer was designed for educational use and built around the new PASCO App: Spectroscopy software. Use the PASCO spectrometer and software to intuitively perform spectroscopy experiments including light source emission studies, determination of the concentration of unknown solutions using Beer’s law, and rates of reactions. The workshop will run for approximately 90 minutes.

Moderators
TL

Thomas Loschiavo

PASCO scientific

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 11:00am
PAD 377

9:30am

W71: Research Experiences for Teachers: Models that Work (Panel Discussion)
Research experiences for teachers vary widely, from short-term, highly defined summer research projects to complete graduate programs. What are the goals and expected outcomes of such experiences? Our panelists will present a variety of models and discuss the impact of teachers’ research experiences on (1) teachers’ growth as science practitioners, (2) the formation of collaborative partnerships, and (3) their students’ scientific reasoning. Finally, we will discuss the potential for broadening teachers’ access to research opportunities, along with corresponding practical concerns such as teacher compensation, K-12 curriculum flexibility, and variance in teachers’ interests and experience levels.

Moderators
ES

Elaine Smith

Marion High School

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 11:00am
PAD 261

9:30am

CANCELLED W97: Using Doceri to Teach Wirelessly, Annotate on the Projector, and Record Screencasts (offered twice)
Teaching traditionally, particularly in large classes, limits an instructor's access to students throughout the classroom. An iPad app called Doceri allows an instructor to move freely around the room during a class - while still controlling a computer, highlighting important concepts, drawing or annotating on the projector - and even recording screencasts of the lecture. Participants in this workshop will practice using the Doceri app in many of its capabilities for classroom management and student engagement.

Participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own iPads with them to the workshop. The workshop will run twice (ninety minutes each) in one three hour block.

Moderators
AJ

Andrew J. Grall

University of Arizona

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 11:00am
MAK D1129

9:30am

S53: Assessment Strategies that Inform Teaching and Learning in Organic Chemistry
Learning organic chemistry can be difficult for students for a number of reasons, in particular because it requires a different approach to learning the material than previous chemistry courses students have taken.  As such, instructors often must use different approaches to teach organic chemistry such that students can be successful in their learning of the discipline.  This symposium invites speakers with interests in the thoughtful use of assessment strategies, both formative and summative, as they are used in organic chemistry courses and their associated laboratories.  Empirical studies related to evaluating metacognition, alternative evaluation strategies, learning outcomes, concept inventory use, and other novel, innovative approaches are welcome.

Presider: David Cartrette, South Dakota State University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P723: Evaluation of a diagnostic assessment for incoming organic chemistry students (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P724: Identifying factors for student success in organic chemistry (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P725: Learning Catalytics: A non-clicker based approach to immediate student feedback in the organic lecture setting (10:15 am to 10:35 am) WITHDRAWN
P726: Changing the stakes: In-class quizzes versus optional homework as checkpoint assessments (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P727: Development of a stereochemistry concept inventory (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P728: Assessment of student understanding in the undergraduate organic chemistry teaching laboratory (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
avatar for David Cartrette

David Cartrette

Associate Professor, South Dakota State University
David Cartrette is Associate Professor of Chemistry and Interim Department Head for The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at South Dakota State University.  He received his Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in chemistry education research from Purdue University.  His research focuses on problem solving, knowledge transfer, and curriculum innovation in STEM disciplines.  

Speakers
MA

MARGARET ASIRVATHAM

University of Colorado-Boulder


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK BLL 126

9:30am

W52: Leapfrog learning - Diagnosing and surmounting obstacles to students' development of more sophisticated chemical thinking
Do you struggle to understand what your students are thinking about chemistry? Come learn about a powerful formative assessment technique called ‘cognitive interviewing’ and practice using this technique to make sense of student thinking around foundational ideas in chemistry that students rely upon to determine how to identify matter and differentiate between kinds of matter. You will learn about the stepping stones that middle school, high school and college students traverse as they gain conceptual sophistication, and how you can move your students toward more expert understanding of chemical identity (the idea that every substance is unique). The workshop will utilize the ‘GoKart Interview Protocol’, a tool co-developed by a team of Boston middle and high school teachers, university faculty, and graduate students. Participants will leave with copies of the protocol and a learning progression map derived from our research study that characterizes productive stepping stones along the progression.

Moderators
HS

Hannah Sevian

University of Massachusetts Boston

Speakers
SB

Scott Balicki

Boston Public Schools
GB

Greg Banks

Boston Public Schools
MC

Michael Clinchot

Boston Public Schools
SC

Steven Cullipher

University of Massachusetts Boston
RH

Robert Huie

Boston Public Schools
JL

Jennifer Lambertz

Boston Public Schools
RL

Rebecca Lewis

Chemistry Teacher, Boston Public Schools
CN

Courtney Ngai

University of Massachusetts Boston
GS

Gabriela Szteinberg

University of Massachusetts Boston
VT

Vicente Talanquer

University of Arizona
MW

Melissa Weinrich

University of Arizona


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 106

9:30am

S41: GOB Chemistry – What Do We Include and How Do We Deliver?
Many health professions programs require one or two semesters of chemistry as a General, Organic, and Biochemistry (GOB) course. This course has a unique set of challenges for the chemical educator including time management, content expectations by programs, and unprepared students who may not see how chemistry applies to their major. Educators are invited to present on their development/management of course content, assessment of student learning, or evidence-based classroom instructional strategies. This session will conclude with a discussion where the audience and the presenters will identify successful trends in teaching the GOB course.

Presider: Laura Frost, Florida Gulf Coast University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P700: G(OB) chemistry using POGIL activities in a large SCALE-UP classroom (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P701: Flexible course design options using POGIL activities (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P702: Use of GOB content in the introduction of organic chemistry to medical laboratory science majors (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P703: Hybrid chemistry courses: Reaching out to the non-traditional student and more (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P704: Online delivery of concept-rich OB labs (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P705: When indicators lie: Acid-base titration of a household drain cleaner (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P706: From E to D. From equilibrium to disease (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
Panel (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
LF

Laura Frost

Florida Gulf Coast University

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LOH 164

9:30am

S15: Student-Centered Learning with a Focus on Improving Process Skills in the Classroom and Laboratory: Student-Centered Learning in Laboratory and Writing Courses
The purpose of this symposium is to bring together practitioners of a variety of student-centered pedagogies (such as PBL, PLTL, POGIL, or TBL), from high school through university level. Emphasis will be placed on those approaches that require students to be actively engaged on a regular basis, with a focus on improving process skills such as communication, teamwork, critical thinking, or problem solving. Presentations that contain assessment of these student-centered approaches are especially welcome.

Presider: Rob Whitnell, Guilford College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P677: Discovery Chemistry:  Using a lab first approach to develop expert attitudes in chemistry (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P678: Guided-inquiry in the general chemistry laboratory sequence (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P679: Development and implementation of guided-inquiry experiments for physical chemistry: The POGIL-PCL project (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P680: Use of a science writing heuristic experiment as the model for a POGIL classroom activity (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P681: Student-centered learning in a writing-intensive upper-division undergraduate seminar: An assignment-based curriculum to teach scientific writing and peer review (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P682: Student-centered learning using an integrative approach in an exploratory junior-level studio laboratory (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P683: Interdisciplinary Research In Sciences (IRIS): An innovative approach to preparing undergraduate researchers (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
Panel (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
GF

Gina Frey

Washington University in St. Louis

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 122

9:30am

S62: Making Chemistry Palatable for Non-Chemistry Majors
This symposia seeks to highlight the challenges, innovations, successes and failures experienced by chemistry educators whose main task involves the education of non-chemistry majors. Papers are sought that will provide insight into successful methods to motivate and educate diverse populations of students who may be either science or non-science majors but who are all non-chemistry majors. Of particular interest are educators who teach chemistry to students majoring in Nutrition, Agriculture, Biology, Nursing and the Arts. Presenters are encouraged to share their experiences with respect to pedagogical efficacy, student motivation, innovative methods of student assessment and efficient course management.

Presider: Nicole John-Thomas, University of the West Indies - Trinidad and Tobago

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P779: Teaching non-science majors: Challenges and rewards (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P780: Best teaching practices and strategies for success with a diverse student audience in General Chemistry (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P781: Introducing inquiry based laboratory modules into an Introductory Chemistry discussion section (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P782: Chemistry and art: Development of a college-level course for non-science majors (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P783: Why Things Work: A course for all students (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P784: CHM 101 at Arizona State University: Past, present, and future (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P785: Tailoring homework and lecture activities in Introductory Chemistry for diverse student interests (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
NJ

Nicole John-Thomas

Lecturer, University of the West Indies

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 102

9:30am

W41: Infusing the Science of Learning into Your Chemistry Classroom: Cognitive Principles
Much research suggests that certain instructional strategies are particularly effective at promoting student learning and attitudes towards science. Yet, incorporating the latest evidence-based instructional practices into an existing lecture-focused classroom can be difficult.

In this workshop, participants will discuss several cognitive principles applicable to everyday use in chemistry courses. Topics such as testing effects, self-explanation, expertise reversal, distributed practice, and illusions of competence will be emphasized. Workshop participants will learn about these cognitive principles as well as the experimental evidence supporting these learning principles, and will be guided in the development of interventions and assessment protocols for several course-related learning issues.

We strongly encourage participants who are interested in how these learning principles apply to several specific instructional strategies to attend our subsequent " Infusing the Science of Learning into Your Chemistry Classroom: Evidence-Based Instructional Strategies" workshop.

Moderators
SP

Sam Pazicni

University of New Hampshire

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1135

9:30am

W44: Inquiry-Based Activities Exploring Light and Atomic Structure
The purpose of this workshop is to provide teachers of first year college chemistry and advanced high school chemistry with some inquiry-based activities designed to help students explore the nature of light, how light interacts with matter, and how this interaction helps us to understand the structure of atoms and molecules. We will begin with activities that explore the wave nature of light, providing evidence that light is a wave, that blue light has higher frequency than red light, and that the energy of light is proportional to frequency. We will then examine the particle nature of light. Finally, we extend the wave-particle duality of light to electrons, and consider how electron waves confined in atoms lead to quantization of electron energies, atomic orbitals and atomic spectra. The workshop will model inquiry-based learning by having participants complete the activities and then discuss them.

Moderators
LE

Laura Eisen

George Washington University

Speakers
SG

samantha glazier

Associate Professor, st. lawrence university
I would love to talk with others about teaching general chemistry and physical chemistry courses and developing community based learning courses around chemistry topics.
JS

Jennifer Schmeisser

St. Lawrence University


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 376

9:30am

S51: Undergraduate Research in Chemistry: Expanding Opportunities and Broadening Participation
Engaging undergraduate chemistry students in research is a valuable enterprise which utilizes some of the best practices of higher education. Chemical educators have demonstrated leadership in developing, implementing, and evaluating curricular and classroom approaches for increasing the number and diversity of student researchers. Presentations regarding individual or group projects in lecture or laboratory, redesigned courses which focus on a specific research topic, and/or the general undergraduate research process are welcome. Faculty who have incorporated research activities and/or projects into specific collegiate chemistry classes are invited to share their experiences. Expanding participation in research, while ambitious and potentially rewarding, also poses difficulties and challenges that differ from those accompanying traditional chemistry instruction. This symposium is an opportunity to communicate best practices and innovative ideas related to increasing the number and quality of undergraduate chemical researchers. 

Presider: Rebecca Jones, George Mason University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P707: Creating an experiential learning exercise for undergraduate equestrian students using the leaching of alfalfa feed hay upon standing in water (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P708: Phosphorus remediation to prevent harmful algal blooms as an experiential learning exercise for an analytical chemistry teaching laboratory (9:55 am to 10:15 am) WITHDRAWN
P709: Qualitative/quantitative analysis of artificial food dyes: A UV/VIS course-embedded research experience for Principles of Chemistry at Georgia Gwinnett College (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P710: Solid-supported azo dye arrays in the development of a colorimetric anion-selective indicator (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P711: Exploring the nature of hydrogen bonding using ab initio natural bond orbital calculations (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P712: Just-in-time approach to undergraduate biochemistry research (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P713: Chemical education research: A viable option in the undergraduate chemistry program at UWI Cave Hill? (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P714: Dealing with scalability through collaborative research in the teaching laboratory (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Jones

Rebecca Jones

George Mason University

Speakers
TB

Tim Born

Grand Valley State University
TC

Timothy Chapp

Allegheny College


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LMH 114

9:30am

W61: New Bite-Sized Chemistry Teaching Resources that use Real 3D Crystal Structures
Fundamental chemistry concepts such as conformation, stereochemistry, chirality and the geometrical shapes of metal coordination spheres cannot be properly understood without knowledge of the three-dimensional nature of chemical compounds. Rather than using molecular modelling kits to aid student learning, with their limitations and misconceptions, how about using real crystal structures? The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) stores the published results of small molecule organic and organometallic X-ray diffraction studies: real structures and not idealised models, thus an ideal resource for teaching chemistry.

This hands-on workshop will familiarise you with the free teaching subset of the CSD, the WebCSD online platform that accesses the subset and to new materials that introduce key chemistry concepts that frequently require visual aids to ensure full concept comprehension. Supervised by an academic with over 20 years teaching experience in UK high schools, these exercises have been written by students for students and have wide applicability.

Moderators
PH

Peter Hoare

Chemistry Outreach Officer, Newcastle University
I'm currently the Chemistry Outreach Officer in the School of Chemistry at Newcastle University, a Russell Group research-intensive University in the north of England, UK. I am a former chemistry schoolteacher with over 25 experience. My job is to promote chemistry to all - mainly schoolchildren of all ages but I do deliver events for the general public, community groups etc. - anyone who'll listen! | | I am currently developing learning... Read More →

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 112

9:30am

S65: Teaching Chemistry by Incorporating Context from the Elementary to the College Classroom
Chemistry education research shows that students build strong connections to chemistry concepts when they can incorporate real-world contexts. As the Next Generation Science Standards become more prevalent at the K-12 level and as more college faculty incorporate current education research to make chemistry relatable, context will continue to grow in its importance. Presentations in this symposium will focus on showing how integration of context has worked in classrooms at various grade levels. 

Presider: Terri Taylor, American Chemical Society

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P796: Resources for incorporating context into your K-12 chemistry/science course (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P797: Inquiry-based chemistry for elementary and middle school teachers (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P798: Teaching high school chemistry content and context using ChemMatters articles to meet Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P799: Chemistry in the Community: Keeping chemistry relevant for high school students (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P800: Contextual experimentation in advanced high school chemistry classes (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P801: Teaching students and volunteers to communicate chemistry to museum attendees (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
MM

Michael Mury

American Chemical Society

Speakers
TT

Terri Taylor

American Chemical Society
ACS Education Division programs, products and services.


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1117

9:30am

S54: Biochemistry Education: Discussion of the Laboratory Environment
Biochemistry education is unique in that students must synthesize learning from many courses (e.g., chemistry and biology) and attain a high-level of representational competence to be successful. Additionally, biochemistry education is unique in that the host department for undergraduate biochemistry courses can be found in many disciplines such as chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and medicine. Thus, research studies and discussions of practice within the laboratory can be found in many journals and spanning a number of disciplines. The purpose of this symposium is to provide a forum for biochemistry education researchers and practitioners to present their work in the biochemistry teaching laboratory.

Presider: Kimberly J. Linenberger, Kennesaw State University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P729: Using time efficiently in the biochemistry lab (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P730: Development of polymerase chain reaction experiments that fit within a single undergraduate biochemistry laboratory session (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P731: Lab on a plate: The 24-well microplate in the biochemistry laboratory (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P732: Incorporating student-derived projects in the biochemistry laboratory (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P733: Introduction of liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry to evaluate protein purification in biochemistry lab (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P734: Characterizing the forces that stabilize DNA: Biophysical analysis of oligonucleotides using thermal denaturation and isothermal titration calorimetry (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
KJ

Kimberly J. Linenberger

Kennesaw State University

Speakers
JR

Jeffrey R. Raker

University of South Florida


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LOH 174

9:30am

S58: George R. Hague Jr. Memorial AP Chemistry Symposium
This symposium is designed for teachers of Advanced Placement Chemistry.  We will reflect together on our struggles and successes during the first year of the revised AP Chemistry curriculum.  Topics covered will include input from the College Board and the Test Development Committee.  Presenters will also share ideas, demos, labs, and other best practices related to the new curriculum.  The symposium honors the many outstanding contributions made by George Hague to chemical education.

Presider: Kathleen Kitzmann, Mercy High School

Related Papers

An Open Meeting with the College Board (9:30 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P755: Activities related to science practice 1 (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P756: Journal of Chemical Education special AP Chemistry issue (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P757: Hydrogen-powered soda bottle rockets (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P758: Using the green crystal lab as a review for the AP Chemistry exam (12:10 pm to 12:30 am)

Moderators
KK

Kathleen Kitzmann

Mercy High School

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1114

9:30am

W18: ChemSource, the NGSS, and the Particle Nature of Matter
In this workshop participants will identify, adapt, and develop classroom-ready templates and lesson plans allied with the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards). They will select the basic material from the ChemSource module, Basic Chemical Reactions, and utilize the NGSS performance expectations for each grade level constructed by blending ideas from Science and Engineering Practices (Inquiry), Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts. The templates will focus on the introduction of the particle nature of matter into middle school and secondary school chemistry instruction. The participants will learn the decision-making process for what they have to add or omit to existing activities to make them consistent with NGSS. In the process, participants will concentrate on answering three questions for their own grade level: (1) What should students know prior to instruction? (2) What characteristics must be common to learning activities? (3) How will I know if students have learned? And (4) How is this instruction alike and different from traditional instruction? The particle nature of matter and chemical reactions have been chosen for illustrative purposes because of their importance to chemistry education and emphasis in the NGSS which illustrates the development of a core concept or learning progression. Although the NGSS are utilized in this workshop, the process is useful for constructing any standards-based instructional materials. Participants will receive a packet of The New ChemSource material for use in the workshop and for future use. They will be able to exit the workshop with several viable lesson plans in their level of interest.

Moderators
MV

Mary Virginia Orna

Professor of Chemistry, College of New Rochelle

Speakers
PS

Patricia Smith

Air Academy High School (CO)


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1123

9:30am

W19: ChemSource, the NGSS, and the Particle Nature of Matter
In this workshop participants will identify, adapt, and develop classroom-ready templates and lesson plans allied with the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards). They will select the basic material from the ChemSource module, Basic Chemical Reactions, and utilize the NGSS performance expectations for each grade level constructed by blending ideas from Science and Engineering Practices (Inquiry), Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts. The templates will focus on the introduction of the particle nature of matter into middle school and secondary school chemistry instruction. The participants will learn the decision-making process for what they have to add or omit to existing activities to make them consistent with NGSS. In the process, participants will concentrate on answering three questions for their own grade level: (1) What should students know prior to instruction? (2) What characteristics must be common to learning activities? (3) How will I know if students have learned? And (4) How is this instruction alike and different from traditional instruction? The particle nature of matter and chemical reactions have been chosen for illustrative purposes because of their importance to chemistry education and emphasis in the NGSS which illustrates the development of a core concept or learning progression. Although the NGSS are utilized in this workshop, the process is useful for constructing any standards-based instructional materials. Participants will receive a packet of The New ChemSource material for use in the workshop and for future use. They will be able to exit the workshop with several viable lesson plans in their level of interest.

Moderators
MV

Mary Virginia Orna

Professor of Chemistry, College of New Rochelle

Speakers
PS

Patricia Smith

Air Academy High School (CO)


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1123

9:30am

S55: Creative Uses of Computational Chemistry and Visualization in the Undergraduate Curriculum
In addition to theory and experiment, computational modeling has become established as another tool to assist chemists in their work.  Advances in computer hardware and software have now made these tools available to everyone.  This symposium will highlight innovative ways that these tools are being used to enhance the learning experience of students in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum.  Activities that involve molecular modeling, visualization, simulation, mathematical software, and other computational methods will be highlighted.  Course-specific examples as well as efforts that integrate computation throughout the curriculum will be included.

Presider: Shawn Sendlinger, North Carolina Central University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P735: Using computational chemistry via WebMO interface to aid in students' understanding of VSEPR theory (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P736: Computational approaches to topics in general and inorganic chemistry (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P737: Chemical equilibrium shift with MS Excel (10:15 am to 10:35 am) WITHDRAWN
P738: Computationally derived organic and bioorganic visualizations (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P739: Implementation of computational chemistry topics and activities in a physical chemistry for engineers course using Shodor and NCSI workshop resources (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P740: Molecular modeling projects developed by undergraduate students (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P741: Electronic structure: Fun for all ages! (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
SS

Shawn Sendlinger

North Carolina Central University

Speakers
TP

Trilisa Perrine

Ohio Northern University
WP

Will Polik

Hope College
JS

JR Schmidt

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LMH 176

9:30am

S56: Engaging Students in Physical Chemistry
Presentations in this symposium may include new laboratory or classroom exercises, new approaches to the structure of the physical chemistry curriculum, active learning pedagogies, the inclusion of contemporary research topics in the curriculum, and the interface of physical chemistry with other disciplines.  Discussions will include issues in the physical chemistry curriculum and strategies to improve student engagement.

Presider: Craig Teague, Cornell College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P742: Using team-based learning strategies to promote student engagement in a thermodynamics course (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P743: Mnemonic devices for thermodynamic relationships (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P744: Student-centered physical chemistry (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P745: Using screencasting to make a symbolic math program accessible to physical chemistry students (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P746: Excel®-based graphical model of ro-vibrational spectra to integrate quantum mechanical, statistical mechanical and spectroscopic concepts (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P747: Reading, writing, and arithmetic: Is there a better balance for engaging physical chemistry students? (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P748: Emphasizing connections in physical chemistry: The case of statistical thermodynamics (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
Panel (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
CT

Craig Teague

Associate Professor, Cornell College
I teach physical chemistry, general chemistry, and other courses in the undergraduate curriculum. I also do student/faculty research. I am interested in active learning, especially through Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning. My student/faculty research centers on investigations of molecular interactions at the nanoscale, mostly to address energy-related questions.

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 123

9:30am

S57: Experiments We Do: Short Stories Edition
Have you developed a new experiment, or modified an existing one in a novel way, which you believe has high educational value, is different, is cool, or is just plain fun?  Do you wish share your ideas with your Chem Ed colleagues, but don't think you need 15-20 minutes for a presentation?  This symposium allows you to present one or two laboratory experiments or activities in a 5-8 minute presentation for each.  Presenters can tell us why the lab was developed, why they think it is useful (why it is neat!), and the nuts-and-bolts of doing the experiment or activity.  Presentations will be grouped based on the laboratory class involved.  Presenters in this symposium can present one or two short talks that count as one under the BCCE's "Rule of Two".

Presider: Curtis Pulliam, Utica College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P749a: Successful production and testing of biodiesel fuel from new and used vegetable oil (9:35 am to 9:45 am)
P749b: Molecular modeling with WebMO as in inquiry based introduction to atomic orbitals (9:45 am to 9:55 am)
P750a: Twist on solubility lab to prepare for ksp math concepts (9:55 am to 10:05 am)
P750b: Everything's more fun in color: Red cabbage pH lab (10:05 am to 10:15 am)
P751a: “Figure it out" investigation of limiting reactants (10:15 am to 10:25 am)
P751b: Economical enzyme kinetics with urease (10:25 am to 10:35 am)
P752: Drugs in the water, parts I and II (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P753a: Sustainable chemistry: Small scale kinetics lab development in real-time (11:10 am to 11:20 am)
P753b: General Chemistry titration exercise for measuring CO2 in air (11:20 am to 11:30 am)
P754: PhET! Using simulations in general-education labs (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
CP

Curtis Pulliam

Associate Professor and Chair, Utica College

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1120

9:30am

W15: cCWCS Miniworkshop: Teaching Basic Chemistry Through Artists' Materials (offered twice)
This workshop will provide college and university faculty with hands on experience and resources that combine the chemistry of artists rsquo materials with the teaching of basic general organic and analytical chemistry principles The workshop is a small slice of the intensive 5 day cCWCS Chemistry Collaborations Workshops and Communities of Scholars Chemistry of Art Workshop funded through a grant from the National Science Foundation NSF TUES Type 3 Project 1022895 The half day workshop will consist of 4 5 laboratory activities facilitated by cCWCS workshop alumni and leaders who have used these lab activities in their teaching Activities may include light and color XRF analysis of paint and metals metal etching and coloring and synthesis and use of indigo dye

Moderators
PH

Patricia Hill

Millersville University

Speakers
MH

Michael Haaf

Ithaca College
JM

Jennifer Mihalick

Chair, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 109

9:30am

W91: The POGIL Project Workshop: Student-Centered Learning in the Laboratory: The POGIL and the Science Writing Heuristic Approaches
POGIL (Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) and SWH (Science Writing Heuristic) are two complementary approaches to laboratory work that follow a three-stage learning cycle and involve active learning and guided inquiry. In response to a question posed by the instructor (POGIL) or questions developed by the students (SWH), students work in teams to gather data from experiments run under a variety of conditions. They examine the pooled data from which they construct theories and make claims that can be backed up by the experimental results. Group discussions, reflective writing, and in some cases additional experiments are used to further develop the concepts. Participants in this workshop will examine model experiments, work with student-generated data in a simulated laboratory setting, and convert existing and currently used lab activities to POGIL or SWH experiments. Workshop participants should bring copies of two of their lab activities for conversion to POGIL or SWH experiments.

Moderators
TG

Tom Greenbowe

Iowa State University

Speakers

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 119

9:30am

W73: Scientific Soapmaking (offered twice)
In the past 20 years a cottage industry has grown around the production of soap on a relatively small scale. Only a minimal physical plant is needed to produce custom-formulated soaps on a scale from 10-100 lbs per batch. This cottage industry is made up primarily of women producing soap and selling it at craft fairs, boutiques, on the internet, and to hotels desiring private-label soap. The science of soapmaking touches on many chemical topics, including stoichiometry, equilibrium, and the properties of acids, bases, alcohols, esters, and oils. This workshop would be appropriate for high school and college faculty desiring to teach a course for students interested in handcrafted soap as a business or hobby. It would also be appropriate for faculty wanting to include a soapmaking module as part of another course. Workshop fee includes a copy of the book, Scientific Soapmaking.

Moderators
KD

Kevin Dunn

Hampden-Sydney College

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 107

9:30am

W83: The POGIL Project Workshop: Classroom Facilitation
There is no single way to implement POGIL -- each time there are unique characteristics that can influence how particular goals are achieved. Facilitating a POGIL classroom effectively involves more than student groups and collaborative activities; it requires careful planning and effective classroom management through reflective facilitation techniques. This workshop is designed to provide participants with an introduction to facilitating POGIL activities. Through this experience, participants will reflect on how facilitation can enhance or interfere with student learning, as well as how facilitation strategies can be critical in the development of student process skills. After attending this session, participants will be able to: (1) name different components of classroom facilitation, (2) explain how the actions of the instructor can promote or inhibit development of student process skills, and (3) propose facilitation strategies for classroom use.

Moderators
TS

Tricia Shepherd

Westminster College

Speakers

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
PAD 168

9:30am

W93: The POGIL Project Workshop: Writing POGIL Activities - An Introduction
This session is an introduction to the essential characteristics and structure of high-quality POGIL activities. Participants will also examine the value of developing content and process objectives for POGIL activities, and create a draft or outline of an activity based on these learning objectives. After attending this session, participants will be able to: (1) identify the basic components of a POGIL activity, such as a model and critical thinking questions, (2) classify questions in an activity according to the following types: directed, convergent, or divergent, (3) classify questions in a learning cycle activity according to the following types: exploration, concept invention/term introduction, or application, (4) use both the Learning Cycle and question types to critically analyze activity structure and guide construction of quality POGIL activities, and (5) write, or begin to write, a POGIL activity focused on specific learning objectives.

Moderators
AH

Amy Hanson

Teacher, Denver Public Schools
I love teaching science, especially chemistry. I currently teach chemistry and AP Chemistry at East High School. When I'm not at school, I love to run, swim, bike, hike, cook and garden.

Speakers
LT

Laura Trout

Lancaster Country Day School


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK D1141

9:30am

S60: Innovations in Teaching Analytical Chemistry: Innovations in the Laboratory
The teaching of Analytical Chemistry – both at the Quantitative Analysis and Instrumental Analysis levels – is an evolving enterprise.  This symposium is intended to highlight new teaching and learning strategies in the classroom and laboratory.  Presentations that highlight new teaching methods such as process oriented guided inquiry, computer simulations, case studies and other engaging pedagogies are welcome.  Strategies that focus on the application of analytical approaches to interdisciplinary fields, such as bioanalytical chemistry, environmental chemistry, forensic analysis, chemical sensors are also encouraged. 

Presider: Mary Walczak, St. Olaf College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P764: Improving synthetic, laboratory and instrumental skills via a series of organic synthetic and nanomaterial projects in the Instrumental Analysis lab (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P765: Exploring and understanding solution growth of Cu2O nanomaterials using chemical analysis as a guided laboratory experience (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P766: Putting chemistry on solid ground: Analysis of solids for a deeper understanding of chemistry (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P767: Building your own photometer: A research-like experience used to teach analytical instrumentation (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P768: Learning about instrumentation by building a UV/Vis spectrophotometer: An Instrumental Analysis project at Doane College (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P769: Accessing instruments off-site: Evaluation of a remote versus in-lab protein identification MALDI experiment in an undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory course (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P770: Inexpensive Arduino-based instrumentation for signal processing in the instrumental analysis laboratory (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P771: Electronics as a platform for innovation in analytical chemistry (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Speakers
CF

Caryl Fish

Saint Vincent College


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAN 107

9:30am

S52: Advice For the New/Returning Professor: What I Wish I Had Known Before I Started Teaching
The intent of this symposium is to mentor rookie college/university professors through the sometimes-harrowing early years of college-level teaching. Talks will focus on the mechanics of teaching to a college audience and create a clearinghouse of anecdotes and ideas related to teaching science at the college/university level. Topics that may be addressed include: teaching to the Millenial generation (teacher v. student expectations); accommodating different learning styles in the same classroom; incorporating innovative and not-so-innovative teaching methods; teaching at a 2-year v. 4-year institution; small versus large class dynamics; balancing teaching and research; promotion and tenure issues.

Presider: Thomas Jose, Blinn College-Bryan Campus

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P715: Adages, axioms and aphorisms: the list continues… (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P716: Be... (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P717: It is what it is, learning from mistakes (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P718: Being a Lone Ranger: Thoughts from a Lone Chemist (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P719: Lessons taught and lessons learned (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P720: Large classrooms as two-way streets (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P721: Lessons learned from being the lone ChemEder in a traditional department of chemistry (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P722: Getting off to an informed start: Insights from the Cottrell Scholars Collaborative New Faculty Workshop (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
TJ

Thomas Jose

Blinn College - Bryan Campus

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK A1111

9:30am

S64: Professional Development for Graduate Teaching Assistants
Graduate students play a critical role in undergraduate education, and their training as apprentice teachers is important especially in light of STEM education reforms. Furthermore, the graduate teaching assistantship (GTAship) often functions as the major preparatory experience for future teaching at the post-secondary level, and there is a correlation between participation in a GTAship and the development of essential research skills. The importance of the GTAship is recognized through the call for more thoroughly developed and widely implemented professional development (PD) for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) by the ACS. Despite this call, there are few studies in the published literature that focus on how GTA PD both supports GTAs during their assistantship and impacts future careers in and outside of academia. This symposium invites presentations from those interested in sharing their research and experiences relating to the PD of chemistry GTAs.

Presider: Kelley Current, Western Michigan University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P792: Combining teaching, research, and professional development: Graduate TA training in chemistry and biochemistry at UC San Diego (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P793: Professional development coursework for training future faculty (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P794: Graduate TA professional development towards reliable assessment of student lab reports (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P795: Effectiveness of role playing in professional safety development among chemistry graduate teaching assistants (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)

Moderators
KC

Kelley Current

Western Michigan University

Speakers
HD

Holly Dembinski

University of California - San Diego


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HON 148 HON 148

9:30am

S63: “Message in a Bottle”: How Do We Reach Millennial Students?
Teaching chemistry can be a daunting task in that one must continually ask themselves the question, “How do you stay current in teaching?”  Almost every educator has – at one time or another – felt that they could have taught a course better, or has tried to find ways to improve on how to involve students in the classroom. This symposium is geared towards any high school or college professor who, with apologies to Sting, has sent out that SOS message and is looking for new ideas and new ways to teach chemistry by using technology, creative lessons, and/or tried-and-true best practices in the classroom.  It is through the sharing of ideas and philosophies on teaching where we, as educators, can increase student learning, increase student retention rates, and attract more students to study chemistry and science.

Presider: James Zubricky, University of Toledo

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P786: Separation of a mixture by fractional distillation and chromatography (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P787: Effects of student input on homework completion and student performance (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P788: Using Artificial Intelligence to increase productivity (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P789: Teaching the mole concept with your mouth shut! (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P790: Online games- fun with organic chemistry (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P791: Using the Socratic method and group work in a flipped classroom to teach the general chemistry sequence (11:30 am to 11:50 am)

Moderators
JZ

Jim Zubricky

Associate Lecturer of Chemistry, University of Toledo
I wil arise and go now, and go to Innisfree, / And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made; / Nine bean rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee, / and live alone in the bee-loud glade. ..." - W.B.Yeats, "Lake Isle of Innisfree" | | | | Let's see: | | -I love to laugh. And when I laugh, I laugh LOUD. | | -I love to make others happy around me. | | -i have the most ecclectic taste in music and it won't make sense... Read More →

Speakers
KM

Kristi Mock

University of Toledo


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1100

9:30am

S59: Importance of the Affective Domain in Research and Teaching
Assessing student affect has become an important aspect of chemistry education research over the past few decades, with Likert becoming a household name for most affect inventories.  Students’ attitudes, interests and values have been known to dictate their academic paths in fairly profound ways; finding effective methods to measure affective outcomes is a crucial component of research, now more than ever. This symposium will include presentations on current inventories/instruments that measure affective outcomes, how these data have impacted cognitive achievements, teaching practices and student retention and what the future holds for research in this domain. 

Presider: Shalini Srinivasan, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and Kristen Murphy, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P759: Chemistry self-concept in high school classrooms (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P1044: A passion for research and exploration? How purpose and expectancy inform women’s identities and career choices in graduate chemistry programs (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P761: Effects of student-choice and teacher-assigned partners on classroom climate (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P762: Promoting self-efficacy and habits in science, sustainability, and service by designing experiences that unify learning across school, family, and community contexts (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P763: Measuring affective learning in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P760: Assessing high school students' attitudes toward chemistry with a shortened semantic differential (11:30 am to 11:50 am) WITHDRAWN

Moderators
SS

Shalini Srinivasan

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Speakers
KM

Kristen Murphy

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1138

9:30am

S21: Flipping the Classroom: General Chemistry, Part 2
The flipped classroom facilitates active engagement between students and teachers during class time, usually through the use of technology to present material to students before the concepts are discussed in class.  This innovative pedagogical method is used by educators ranging from elementary school through college.  There are many different technological tools used to implement this pedagogical method.  Some educators pre-record lectures of themselves presenting material, others use screen casts to convey information to students before attending class in order to facilitate more peer-to-peer learning, and some teachers use a flipped classroom approach that does not involve videos.  Ultimately, the shift in learning is focused on changing the classroom from passive to active.  The focus of our symposium will be about how teachers use the face-to-face class time gained by changing from a completely lecture based classroom.  This symposium is sponsored by the CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education. 

Presider: Jennifer Muzyka, Centre College

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P692: Unlikely Ed Fellows: How Bill Simmons, the Amish, and Edwin Porter helped me transform the classroom (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P693: Lessons for the flipped classroom approach in a large general chemistry course (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P694: Creation of tools for flipping classes (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P695: Using a flipped class to engage general chemistry students (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P696: Teaching a flipped chemistry course without internet access (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P697: Initial assessment of a flipped general chemistry component in a GOB course sequence at a predominantly undergraduate institution (PUI) (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P698: “Hybridized" general chemistry: How to squeeze a 378-student lecture into a 126-seat active learning classroom (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P699: Flipping a large general chemistry class: Comparisons of results with traditional lecture and suggestions for success (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
JM

Jennifer Muzyka

Professor, Centre College

Speakers
CL

Chris Luker

Highland Local Schools


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LTT 101

9:30am

S61: Integrating Library and Information Resources into Chemistry Curricula
Information literacy, the ability to find and evaluate information resources, is an important skill for future scientists. For example, students and scientists need to distinguish between information provided by Wikipedia, ChemSpider, research journals, and the New York Times. Professors and librarians often teach this skill through database demonstrations, video tutorials, and lectures. However, it is possible to increase the impact of these activities by designing chemistry projects that incorporate information literacy as a learning outcome. This symposium provides a forum to share activities that help students find and evaluate information resources in the context of a science course. Of particular interest are activities and assignments that integrate information literacy and chemical literacy. All forms of activities are encouraged including videos, course projects, in-class activities, and online activities. 

Presider: Charity Lovitt, Seattle University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P772: Monitoring student abilities and perceptions regarding information literacy in chemistry (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P773: Research strategy for searching the literature more effectively (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P774: Collaborative chemical information literacy: Is it "scholarly?" (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P775: Student engagement through writing: An undergraduate e-journal project (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P776: Designing a library research project to identify credible resources on climate change (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P777: Debunking pseudoscience: Video projects and related assignments to promote critical thinking of scientific information by chemistry students (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P778: Wikipedia editing in chemistry classrooms: Learning chemistry and improving information competencies simultaneously (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)

Moderators
CL

Charity Lovitt

Lecturer, University of Washington at Bothell

Speakers
KS

Kristen Shuyler

Seattle University


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
MAK B1112

9:30am

W64: Open-source teaching materials: Tailoring the text and other teaching materials to meet the needs of your classroom.
Open source materials provide an instructor with the opportunity to have more control over the texts required for their course by allowing them to fit the textbook to their course rather than being forced to make the course fit the textbook. These materials also provide instructors with a method to lower the cost of textbooks for their students. This workshop will give participants the opportunity to learn more about what open source materials are all about. The first part of the workshop will be a discussion of open source materials including the following questions: What does open source mean exactly? What types of open source materials are available? How can we be confident in the quality of open source materials (are they peer reviewed)? How will students access these materials? In the second portion of the workshop, instructors will work to investigate and integrate open-source content into their curriculum.

Moderators
KN

Kelly Neiles

St. Mary's College of Maryland

Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 115

9:30am

S13: Research in Chemistry Education
This symposium provides a forum for chemical education research. A submitted presentation should briefly address (1) the motivation for the research and type of problem investigated and (2) the methodology chosen to both gather and interpret the data collected. The presentation should focus primarily on the findings and the interpretation of the data. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS DivCHED Committee on Chemistry Education Research. 

Presider: Brent Ferrell, University of Northern Colorado

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P669: Online homework in introductory chemistry (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P670: Comparison of two online homework systems based on student performance within the context of the Technology Acceptance Model in Introductory Chemistry (9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P671: First look at accelerated chemistry (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P672: Evidence for the success of a supplemental chemistry course (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P673: What role should massive open online courses (MOOCs) and other open courseware have in chemical education? (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P674: Do pre-exam writing activities reduce test-anxiety in non-majors organic chemistry students? (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P675: Self-regulated learning strategies and academic performance of students in senior secondary schools (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P676: Elementary education pre-service teachers' chemical reasoning (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
TP

Thomas Pentecost

Grand Valley State University

Speakers
JB

Jack Barbera

Associate Professor, University of Northern Colorado
The field of psychometrics dates back more than a century and is concerned with the theory and practice of psychological and educational measurement. Researchers in this field have established protocols to develop and evaluate a wide variety of assessment instruments, including multiple-choice concept inventories. With these protocols, chemists can make measurements of student knowledge and understanding with the same care and precision they... Read More →
JV

Jessica VandenPlas

Grand Valley State University


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LTT 103

9:30am

S17: Web-Based Resources for Chemical Education
This symposium seeks presentations on resources that can be obtained over the Internet, and ways they can be utilized for the teaching and learning of chemistry. We are seeking presentations that address perspectives of development and implementation of web based technologies, and their applications to classroom, hybrid and online learning environments. Topics such as the application of mobile devices, and how social networking and semantic web technologies are influencing chemical education are also encouraged. The objective of this symposium is to provide educators and developers opportunities to share resources and experiences. This symposium is sponsored by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education, http://www.ccce.divched.org/.

Presider: John H. Penn, West Virginia University

Related Papers

Introduction (9:30 am to 9:35 am)
P684: Creating chemistry animations: A comparison of different web-based tools and environments (9:35 am to 9:55 am)
P685: Animating the solutions to sample problems can aid students in developing problem solving strategies s 9:55 am to 10:15 am)
P686: Next generation of PhET, right in your web browser: New HTLM5 simulations for teaching and learning chemistry (10:15 am to 10:35 am)
P687: Visualizing the Chemistry of Climate Change (VC3Chem): Online modules and visualizations for teaching and learning chemistry through the context of climate science (10:35 am to 10:55 am)
Break (10:55 am to 11:10 am)
P688: Before, during and after class activities in introductory chemistry: Theory and web site (11:10 am to 11:30 am)
P689: Before, during and after class activities in introductory chemistry: Activities and exemplar (11:30 am to 11:50 am)
P690: Computer simulations, animations and guided-inquiry activities for general chemistry (11:50 am to 12:10 pm)
P691: Visualization of molecular symmetry using mobile devices (12:10 pm to 12:30 pm)

Moderators
RE

Robert E. Belford

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Speakers
JH

Jonathan H. Gutow

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
JH

John H. Penn

West Virginia University - Morgantown


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
LTT 102

9:30am

W35: Hands on Workshop on Proteopedia: A Powerful Tool for Biomolecular Communication and a 3D Web Encyclopedia of Biomolecules (offered twice)
Proteopedia is an interactive resource that facilitates understanding the role of 3D protein structures have in their biological function http://proteopedia.org. Proteopedia is widely used in scientific research, in the preparation of papers for publication and teaching from secondary level to post-graduate.

The workshop is aimed at researchers, teachers and students, who will learn how to:

To browse the > 100,000 pages in Proteopedia, e.g.
http://proteopedia.org/w/HIV-1_protease
http://proteopedia.org/w/Ribosome
http://proteopedia.org/w/Group:SMART:A_Physical_Model_of_the_β2-Adrenergic_Receptor
To create your own pages in Proteopedia, including
Adding 3D interactive scenes via a user friendly GUI for Jmol
Adding text to Proteopedia pages, with hyperlinks to the interactive scenes.

This Proteopedia workshop smoothly blends with two other workshops offered in this same BBCE 2014: "Jmol for Beginners" and "Ultimate Jmol".

Moderators
Speakers
JL

Joel L. Sussman

Weizmann Institute of Science


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 12:30pm
HRY 117

9:30am

W8: Automotive Energy Needs and Environmental Impacts
The presenters teach a two-semester General Chemistry course to undergraduate engineering majors using the theme of Chemistry and the Automobile. This workshop will explore automotive energy needs (morning) and environmental impacts (afternoon). Participant breakout groups will be asked to identify specific examples related to these themes and to suggest ways of integrating them into the chemistry curriculum. This cycle will be repeated three times in the morning and afternoon. The three morning cycles will focus on traditional fuels, alternative fuels (e.g. biofuels, hydrogen, and natural gas) and on the pros and cons associated with the use of three batteries – the lead storage battery, the nickel metal hydride battery, and the lithium ion battery. The three afternoon cycles will focus on air pollution, other environmental impacts, and possible case studies. The presenters will provide feedback on how these topics are integrated into their courses and a list of useful resources.

Moderators
CD

Craig Donahue

University of Michigan-Dearborn

Speakers
CS

Codruta Savu

University of Michigan-Dearborn


Wednesday August 6, 2014 9:30am - 5:00pm
MAK D1117

11:00am

CANCELLED W97: Using Doceri to Teach Wirelessly, Annotate on the Projector, and Record Screencasts (offered twice)
Teaching traditionally, particularly in large classes, limits an instructor's access to students throughout the classroom. An iPad app called Doceri allows an instructor to move freely around the room during a class - while still controlling a computer, highlighting important concepts, drawing or annotating on the projector - and even recording screencasts of the lecture. Participants in this workshop will practice using the Doceri app in many of its capabilities for classroom management and student engagement.

Participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own iPads with them to the workshop. The workshop will run twice (ninety minutes each) in one three hour block.

Moderators
AJ

Andrew J. Grall

University of Arizona

Wednesday August 6, 2014 11:00am - 12:30pm
MAK D1129

2:00pm